striped jack

striped jack

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
VNN is included of the family of Nodaviridae that infect fish belong to the genus Betanodavirus for which the type species is striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV) [4].
One of the initial multiplication sites of the virus in larval striped jack was the spinal cord just above the swimbladder; then the virus spread backward to the end of spinal cord and forward to the brain to terminate in the retina probably via the optic nerve.
Properties of a new virus belonging to Nodaviridae found in larval striped jack (Pseudocaranx dentex) with nervous necrosis.
Progression of striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV) infection in naturally and experimentally infected striped jack Pseudocaranx dentex larvae.
Presently, a new sea ranching project is being developed, in which artificially reared juvenile striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex, are released at a floating platform where they naturally aggregate.
The ontogenetic changes in association behavior in striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex, were therefore studied with hatchery-raised larvae and juveniles.
We observed only horizontal distributions as an index of association behavior because in hatchery tanks, larvae and early juveniles of striped jack usually occur in the upper 30 cm of the water column.
4), showing that striped jack begin association behavior at 12 mm in TL with both transparent and gray objects.
For example, striped jack show strong phototaxis from 3.
Our results indicate that striped jack first started to show association behavior at 12 mm TL.
Striped jack showed stronger association behavior in darkness than in light--a finding that seems to conflict with Gooding and Magnuson (1967) who found that residents of an experimental floating raft accumulate more rapidly by day than by night.
In conclusion, the association behavior of striped jack appeared at 12 mm and is probably dependent on a mechanosensory system, as well as vision.