stratification

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stratification

 [strat″ĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
arrangement in layers.

strat·i·fi·ca·tion

(strat'i-fi-kā'shŭn),
The process or result of separating a sample into subsamples according to specified criteria such as age or occupational groups.
[L. stratum, layer, + facio, to make]

stratification

The grouping of subjects/patients based on key prognostic factors measured at baseline.

strat·i·fi·ca·tion

(strat'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
The process or result of separating a sample into subsamples according to specified criteria, such as age or occupational group.
[L. stratum, layer, + facio, to make]

stratification

a process in which certain seeds are subjected to low temperatures for a period of time, in order for GERMINATION to take place. Natural stratification occurs when seeds are shed in autumn and become covered with soil, leaves, etc. during the winter. The process can be reproduced artificially by alternating layers of seeds with layers of moistened substrate such as sphagnum moss and storing at a low temperature.

stratification

1. arrangement in layers.
2. in statistical terms the division of a population into subpopulations on the basis of specified criteria such as age, breed, parity. See stratified random sample.
References in periodicals archive ?
This model, applied to class research, reveals a clear hypothesis about the mechanism between linguistic use and stratificational outcomes which is close to Bernstein's (1975) theory of restricted and elaborate codes: Restricted, lower class linguistic code tends to correlate with simple and merely descriptive, short-sighted causal assumptions.
Set against the `behavioural and cultural linkage' in class theory, PW's `autonomisation' refers to the detachment of subjective orientations and behaviour from stratificational location.
This outline reveals stratificational (vertical) class distinctions in town and country distinguishing a literate 'gentry' from the illiterate, rather than a (horizontal) distinction between a rural and urban culture.
Both formal and informal social networks produce respectable amounts of marginal improvement in the model and they affect, but do not wipe out the effects of, the original baseline variables: Social networks resources are not reducible to more accepted stratificational assets.