strangulation


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Related to strangulation: strangulated hernia

strangulation

 [strang″gu-la´shun]
1. choke (def. 2).
2. impairment of blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels; see also hemostasis (def. 2).

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with incarceration.
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense: compression, constriction, herniation.

strangulation

/stran·gu·la·tion/ (strang″gu-la´shun)
1. choke (2).
2. arrest of circulation in a part due to compression. See hemostasis (2).

strangulation

(străng′gyə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of strangling or strangulating.
b. The state of being strangled or strangulated.
2. Medicine Constriction of a body part so as to cut off the flow of blood or another fluid: strangulation of the intestine.

strangulation

[strang′gyəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, strangulare, to choke
the constriction of a tubular structure of the body, such as the trachea, a segment of bowel, or the blood vessels of a limb, that prevents function or impedes circulation. See also intestinal strangulation.
Forensics The act of suffocating a person by constricting the trachea or upper airways
Medspeak The blocking of the normal flow of blood, faeces, etc.—through an elongated or tubular structure—e.g., a strangulated hernia (GI contents)—or penile strangulation by placing metal rings at the base of the penis, stopping blood flow, which may require amputation

strangulation

Forensic medicine Transient, or more commonly, permanent occlusion of the tracheal lumen; 3500 suicidal strangulations occur/yr–US, 1983; homicidal strangulations represent 5-10% of criminally violent deaths in urban populations. Cf Sexual asphyxia Obstetrics See Cord strangulation.
Strangulation–Manner, mechanism, setting
Manner of death Hanging–usually suicidal, ligature, manual, postural
Mechanism of death
Mechanical constriction of neck structures–primary mechanism in suicidal stangulation; it is unknown whether arterial occlusion, venous occlusion, or asphyxia causes most deaths in 'mechanical' strangulation
Injury to spinal cord and brainstem–due to drop, the intended cause of death in judicial hangings
Cardiac arrest, possibly facilitated by pressure on the carotid sinus, and pericarotid sympathetic and parasympathetic networks
Setting Suicidal, homicidal, accidental, judicial–no longer performed in developed nations, despite its alleged value as a crime deterrent and for pre-TV entertainment
Ann Emerg Med 1984; 13:179

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn)
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense.

strangulation

Constriction or compression of any passage or tube in the body, such as the jugular veins of the neck in manual strangulation, or the intestine in HERNIA. Strangulation may also result from twisting of a part as in VOLVULUS or torsion of the testis.

strangulation,

n a choking or throttling. The arrest of respiration resulting from occlusion of the air passage or arrest of the circulation in part because of compression.

strangulation

1. arrest of respiration by occlusion of the air passages.
2. impairment of the blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels. See also colic (2), intestinal obstruction, intestinal strangulation.
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6) One of the authors has had the unpleasant experience of a toddler die following a strangulation injury by an older sibling, with a religious thread present around the neck.
According to the report released today, felony domestic strangulation charges increased by 26.
Previous investigations and trials linked the last pair of slayings - the 1992 killings of Debra Williams and Mary Edwards - to David Allan Jones, a retarded janitor who confessed to the killings along with the strangulation in 1992 of Tammie Christmas.
Entanglement and strangulation from older window covering cords are a hidden hazard," said CPSC Acting Chairman Nancy Nord.
Since 1991 CPSC has received reports of about 200 strangulation deaths involving cords and chains on window coverings.
Another strangulation danger is from the inner cord -- the cord that is attached to each louver.
An autopsy revealed Zavala Wilson died from asphyxiation caused by manual strangulation and chest compression that could have been caused by someone straddling her chest.
From January 1991 through August 2004, CPSC received reports of about 180 strangulation deaths involving cords and chains on window coverings.
Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the Window Covering Safety Council and independent retailers have joined forces to raise awareness of strangulation risks presented by window covering cords and chains.
16 of first-degree murder for the strangulation of his girlfriend, Maria Ruiz-Smeriglio, and the shooting death of his father, William Marky, a few hours later.