strangulation


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Related to strangulation: strangulated hernia

strangulation

 [strang″gu-la´shun]
1. choke (def. 2).
2. impairment of blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels; see also hemostasis (def. 2).

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with incarceration.
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense: compression, constriction, herniation.

strangulation

/stran·gu·la·tion/ (strang″gu-la´shun)
1. choke (2).
2. arrest of circulation in a part due to compression. See hemostasis (2).

strangulation

(străng′gyə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of strangling or strangulating.
b. The state of being strangled or strangulated.
2. Medicine Constriction of a body part so as to cut off the flow of blood or another fluid: strangulation of the intestine.

strangulation

[strang′gyəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, strangulare, to choke
the constriction of a tubular structure of the body, such as the trachea, a segment of bowel, or the blood vessels of a limb, that prevents function or impedes circulation. See also intestinal strangulation.
Forensics The act of suffocating a person by constricting the trachea or upper airways
Medspeak The blocking of the normal flow of blood, faeces, etc.—through an elongated or tubular structure—e.g., a strangulated hernia (GI contents)—or penile strangulation by placing metal rings at the base of the penis, stopping blood flow, which may require amputation

strangulation

Forensic medicine Transient, or more commonly, permanent occlusion of the tracheal lumen; 3500 suicidal strangulations occur/yr–US, 1983; homicidal strangulations represent 5-10% of criminally violent deaths in urban populations. Cf Sexual asphyxia Obstetrics See Cord strangulation.
Strangulation–Manner, mechanism, setting
Manner of death Hanging–usually suicidal, ligature, manual, postural
Mechanism of death
Mechanical constriction of neck structures–primary mechanism in suicidal stangulation; it is unknown whether arterial occlusion, venous occlusion, or asphyxia causes most deaths in 'mechanical' strangulation
Injury to spinal cord and brainstem–due to drop, the intended cause of death in judicial hangings
Cardiac arrest, possibly facilitated by pressure on the carotid sinus, and pericarotid sympathetic and parasympathetic networks
Setting Suicidal, homicidal, accidental, judicial–no longer performed in developed nations, despite its alleged value as a crime deterrent and for pre-TV entertainment
Ann Emerg Med 1984; 13:179

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn)
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense.

strangulation

Constriction or compression of any passage or tube in the body, such as the jugular veins of the neck in manual strangulation, or the intestine in HERNIA. Strangulation may also result from twisting of a part as in VOLVULUS or torsion of the testis.

strangulation,

n a choking or throttling. The arrest of respiration resulting from occlusion of the air passage or arrest of the circulation in part because of compression.

strangulation

1. arrest of respiration by occlusion of the air passages.
2. impairment of the blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels. See also colic (2), intestinal obstruction, intestinal strangulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ram's human factors specialist determined the typical cross-sectional area of the neck at which pressure is applied in ligature strangulation.
Delayed death after pressure of the neck, possible usual mechanism and implication for mode of death in manual strangulation discussed.
The results of the Oregon study suggest that the risk for participation in strangulation activities was higher for youths who had other health risk factors, particularly substance use and certain mental health risk factors.
Carlson imposed a five-year prison term for assault - double the usual and the maximum allowed by law - plus one year in jail for strangulation and menacing to be served after his release from prison.
Prosecutors that interviewed the teenager noticed she had marks on her neck that resembled strangulation, according to the police report.
The suspect said that it would be impossible for Durolfo to die because of manual strangulation since nobody hurt her that night.
All patients who were admitted with history of irreducibility or obstruction without evidence of strangulation were treated with conservative treatment (taxis) initially and then were taken up for emergency surgery.
THE difficulty in this type of killing is that strangulation leaves no physical trace.
They both come up with the cause of death which I will record as the definitive cause - drowning and ligature strangulation.
Or was Sir Stuart's special delivery of new higher-spec briefs causing Paxo more strangulation than support?
Artur Khanzadyan, 25, is accused in the strangulation death of Odet Tsaturyan, 24, of Glendale on Sept.
Professor Guy Rutty told Stafford Crown Court yesterday that he found 26 areas of injury and bruising to her body but there were two possible causes, a head injury or strangulation.