strangulation


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Related to strangulation: strangulated hernia

strangulation

 [strang″gu-la´shun]
1. choke (def. 2).
2. impairment of blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels; see also hemostasis (def. 2).

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with incarceration.
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense: compression, constriction, herniation.

strangulation

/stran·gu·la·tion/ (strang″gu-la´shun)
1. choke (2).
2. arrest of circulation in a part due to compression. See hemostasis (2).

strangulation

(străng′gyə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of strangling or strangulating.
b. The state of being strangled or strangulated.
2. Medicine Constriction of a body part so as to cut off the flow of blood or another fluid: strangulation of the intestine.

strangulation

[strang′gyəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, strangulare, to choke
the constriction of a tubular structure of the body, such as the trachea, a segment of bowel, or the blood vessels of a limb, that prevents function or impedes circulation. See also intestinal strangulation.
Forensics The act of suffocating a person by constricting the trachea or upper airways
Medspeak The blocking of the normal flow of blood, faeces, etc.—through an elongated or tubular structure—e.g., a strangulated hernia (GI contents)—or penile strangulation by placing metal rings at the base of the penis, stopping blood flow, which may require amputation

strangulation

Forensic medicine Transient, or more commonly, permanent occlusion of the tracheal lumen; 3500 suicidal strangulations occur/yr–US, 1983; homicidal strangulations represent 5-10% of criminally violent deaths in urban populations. Cf Sexual asphyxia Obstetrics See Cord strangulation.
Strangulation–Manner, mechanism, setting
Manner of death Hanging–usually suicidal, ligature, manual, postural
Mechanism of death
Mechanical constriction of neck structures–primary mechanism in suicidal stangulation; it is unknown whether arterial occlusion, venous occlusion, or asphyxia causes most deaths in 'mechanical' strangulation
Injury to spinal cord and brainstem–due to drop, the intended cause of death in judicial hangings
Cardiac arrest, possibly facilitated by pressure on the carotid sinus, and pericarotid sympathetic and parasympathetic networks
Setting Suicidal, homicidal, accidental, judicial–no longer performed in developed nations, despite its alleged value as a crime deterrent and for pre-TV entertainment
Ann Emerg Med 1984; 13:179

stran·gu·la·tion

(strang'gyū-lā'shŭn)
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense.

strangulation

Constriction or compression of any passage or tube in the body, such as the jugular veins of the neck in manual strangulation, or the intestine in HERNIA. Strangulation may also result from twisting of a part as in VOLVULUS or torsion of the testis.

strangulation,

n a choking or throttling. The arrest of respiration resulting from occlusion of the air passage or arrest of the circulation in part because of compression.

strangulation

1. arrest of respiration by occlusion of the air passages.
2. impairment of the blood supply to a part by mechanical constriction of the vessels. See also colic (2), intestinal obstruction, intestinal strangulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
6%) cases are hanging (10%) and ligature strangulation (0.
A Richter type hernia can be difficult to diagnose and they rapidly lead to strangulation of the hernia contents.
Our case is the first case of dislocation of the symphysis of the hyoid bone following strangulation in survivors.
Treatment of penile strangulation caused by constricting devices.
A child can get in trouble easily and silently and be at risk within seconds of strangulation and death.
Strangulation has also been reported as the cause of death in more than 50% of all playground fatalities in children.
A fracture of the thyroid cartilage was often found in cases of strangulation.
The state medical examiner concluded the cause of death was accidental strangulation.
The recall was due to risks associated with the lid supports on the toy chest failing to prevent the lid from dosing too quickly, posing an entrapment and strangulation hazard to young children.
The choking game consists of strangulation, either self-strangulation or strangulation by another person, for the purpose of achieving a brief state of euphoria, a "high.
The jury unanimously agreed that the cause of death was ligature strangulation.
Although emergency surgery is mandatory in the case of total occlusion or when strangulation is suspected, partial occlusion is an indication for conservative treatment consisting of an NPO (nil per os) diet, nasogastric tube suction, and intravenous fluid resuscitation with the correction of electrolyte imbalance, he said in an interview.