storage fungi

storage fungi

fungi that are particularly adapted to grow on stored feeds, e.g. Stachybotrys, Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also Sufaida compounds were found effective against some fungal pathogens like storage fungi Aspergillus flavus Link and A.
Grains can be contaminated by spores of storage fungi during harvest, transport and handling operations [31].
Most of the storage fungi are species of Aspergillus and Penicillium.
Tuite and Christensen (1957) have even noted that inoculation of ripe plants with spores of storage fungi did not increase the percentage of seed infected and they also found that storage fungi associated with 1 out of 300 samples of wheat grain collected.
Among the storage fungi cited are Aspergillus flavus [10] and Penicillium sp [7,4].
The minimum temperature for growth of storage fungi is about 40[degrees]F (4[degrees]C), with optimum temperatures from 80 to 90[degrees]F (27-32[degrees]C).
BACTERIA TYPE BIOLOGY Bacillus cereus Gram (+) Gastrointestinal illness in humans Bacillus megaterium Gram (+) Common in soil and vegetation Bacillus subtilis Gram (+) Common in soil and vegetation, used as seed treatment to protect plants against root pathogens Chryseobacterium Gram (-) Common in soils, plants, food stuffs, and water systems Pantoea Gram (-) Biocontrol of storage fungi on citrus, can cause bacte- rial brown spot on melons Pseudomonas Gram (-) Biocontrol of fungi on turf aureofaciens P.
These conditions do not necessarily occur in a tropical environment and colonization by storage fungi will frequently occur affecting, for example, lipid metabolism of soybean seed (Lisker et al.
Scarification or punctures of the pericarp of corn seed allow rapid invasion by storage fungi, leading to reduced germination (Christensen & Lopez, 1963).