stochastic effect

stochastic effect

(stŏ-kas′tik, stō-)
A phenomenon that occurs purely by chance.
References in periodicals archive ?
12, 13, 14) that when the cell size is large enough the stochastic effect added by the ion channels to the membrane potential is trivial, but when the cell size is small the stochastic effect due to the ion channels is very crucial [31].
The first sign of the presence of a stochastic effect is induced cancer.
It is possible that any dose of radiation may have a stochastic effect and as such, no dose of radiation is considered safe.
The complexity stems from nonlinearity, uncertainty, time delay, system singularity, stochastic effects, the presence of interconnections, and so forth.
A more challenging weakness of amplification-based methods is that they are not intrinsically well-suited to quantitation of the target analyte; the combination of non-linear amplification (exponential, in most methods), stochastic effects, and variable presence of inhibitory substances in samples all make quantitation highly challenging.
Cerf proposes a finite population counterpart to Eigen's model of evolution, which incorporates stochastic effects.
The subject of the tender is in particular the need to face the situation that children represent a risk group in terms of the probability of inducing adverse effects of stochastic effects of ionizing radiation.
A lot of what we know about stochastic effects in humans, Seward said, comes from long-term studies of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Stochastic effects do not have known thresholds, and the BEIR VII reports indicate a linear related response from very low exposure to radiation.
The intent of this collection of papers is to give health professionals and researchers an understanding of the deterministic and stochastic effects and biomarkers related to early and late health risk.

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