stimulus control


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Related to stimulus control: discriminative stimulus

control

 [kon-trōl´]
1. the governing or limitation of certain objects, events, or physical responses.
2. a standard against which experimental observations may be evaluated, as a procedure identical to the experimental procedure except for the absence of the one factor being studied.
3. conscious restraint and regulation of impulses and suppression of instincts and affects.
4. a patient or group differing from the case or treated group under study by lacking the disease or by having a different or absent treatment or regimen. The controls and subjects usually otherwise have certain similarities to allow or enhance comparison between them.
automatic brightness control an automated exposure device used in radiology; it senses light and adjusts itself to produce a predetermined fluoroscopic density.
automatic exposure control a timer by which the exposure of x-ray film is determined by the radiographer but the length of exposure is determined by the equipment.
aversive control in behavior therapy, the use of unpleasant stimuli to change undesirable behavior.
birth control see birth control.
hemorrhage control in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reduction or elimination of rapid and excessive blood loss.
infection control see infection control.
infection control: intraoperative in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as preventing nosocomial infection in the operating room.
motor control the generation and coordination of movement patterns to produce function; it may either control movements of the body in space or stabilize the body in space. See also postural control.
postural control motor control that stabilizes the body in space by integrating sensory input about body position (somatosensory, visual, and vestibular input) with motor output to coordinate the action of muscles and keep the body's center of mass within its base of support. An important aspect of postural control is the righting reactions. Called also balance.
stimulus control any influence exerted by the environment on behavior.

stim·u·lus con·trol

the use of conditioning techniques to bring the target behavior of an individual under environmental control. See: classical conditioning.

stimulus control

a strategy for self-modification that depends on manipulating the causes of behavior to increase goals or behaviors desired by a patient while decreasing those that are undesired.

stim·u·lus con·trol

(stim'yū-lŭs kŏn-trōl')
The use of conditioning techniques to bring the target behavior of an individual under environmental control.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, for the participants in Group 2 who previously responded in accordance with stimulus equivalence, it is difficult to explain why stimulus control generating a response pattern partly unrelated to previous reinforcement contingencies should take precedence over the stimulus control in line with experimenter-defined stimulus equivalence classes previously seen.
Computer software for stimulus control research with Macintosh computers.
However, the performances of participant 3 could not be brought under the targeted stimulus control.
Children with autism and non-disabled children demonstrated restricted stimulus control when the compound stimulus elements were isolated and tested individually.
2002), and therefore a non-arbitrary relation could be used to enhance the stimulus control of the arbitrary relation if properly introduced.
Assessing stimulus control in natural settings: An analysis of stimuli that acquire control during training.
Behavioral therapy uses relaxation training, stimulus control, and sleep restriction to manage insomnia
In the book conditioning procedure used herein, the target stimulus control for visual observing was attention to book-related stimuli (e.
This involves many elements - stimulus control (your bed is only for sleep), sleep restriction (restrict time in bed to your usual sleeping time) relaxation therapy and dealing with poor sleep habits.
The behavior treatments include Relaxation Therapy, Stimulus Control Therapy and Sleep Restriction.
Sleep hygiene does not refer to complex behavioral interventions such as sleep restriction or stimulus control therapy, which require treatment from a sleep specialist.