stimulative music

stimulating music

Music therapy
Assertive or buoyant music used in music therapy, which may stimulate the rest of the body to join the rhythm by evoking hand clapping, dancing and other reactions. Stimulating music may have major changes in pitch, dynamics or rhythm, which usually is similar to that of an “alert” heart—i.e., 70–90 beats/minute; styles regarded as stimulative include Big Band, Dixie-land, Gospel, and others.

stimulative music

Music therapy Assertive or buoyant music that may prompt the body into joining the rhythm, evoking hand clapping, dancing, etc. Cf Sedative music.
References in periodicals archive ?
As well as using stimulative music during training, many athletes are discovering the recuperative benefits of calming music following a tough workout," he said.
Gaston (1951) identified the qualities of both types of music and described how they affected the listener: stimulative music exhibited an unrestrained quality, and contained brief, staccato melodies, a clear underlying beat and percussive rhythms that encouraged physical activity.
The PFSM allowed the rater to accurately assessed 100% of the sedative music and 84% of the stimulative music.
The Yates's Continuity Correction indicated that the PFSM distinguished between sedative and stimulative music and confirmed the tool's intrinsic validity.
In general, stimulative music was distinguished from sedative by four of the five subsections of melody: embellished, accented, angular and harsh melodic lines.
Nevertheless I found that there were many common structures (factors) in sedative and in stimulative music, predictable as well as unpredictable.
Effects of sedative and stimulative music on activity levels of severely retarded boys.