stereotypy

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stereotypy

 [ster´e-o-ti″pe]
the persistent repetition of senseless acts or words, frequently occurring in disorders such as autistic disorder and schizophrenia; called also stereotypy-habit disorder.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī'pē),
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[stereo- + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

/ster·eo·ty·py/ (ster´e-o-ti″pe) persistent repetition or sameness of acts, ideas, or words.

stereotypy

(stĕr′ē-ə-tī′pē, stîr′-)
n. pl. stereoty·pies
a. Excessive repetition or lack of variation in movements, postures, or patterns of speech, especially when viewed as a symptom of certain developmental or psychiatric disorders.
b. Abnormal, repeated, nonfunctional behavior, such as pacing or chewing, in a captive or domesticated animal.

stereotypy

[ster′ē·ətī′pē]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + typos, mark
the persistent, inappropriate mechanical repetition of actions, body postures, or speech patterns, usually occurring with a lack of variation in thought processes or ideas. It is often seen in patients with schizophrenia. stereotypical, adj.

stereotypy

Neurology A non-goal-directed automatic and/or persistent mechanical repetition of speech or motor activity; a series of repetitive complex movements that simulate motor tics, seen in Pts with hyperactivity, mental retardation, schizophrenia, psychosis.Cf Motor tic.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

References in periodicals archive ?
Reproductive status and stereotypies in breeding mares: A brief report.
Stereotypies occur in about 20% of typically developing children (called "primary") and are classified into:
A validity study on the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF) Scale: Predicting treatment success for self-injury, aggression, and stereotypies.
The literature on experimental FA is limited to problem behaviors such as self-injury, aggression, stereotypies, and other behaviors often found among people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.
Furthermore, a contrasting quiet environment may be unpleasant and may increase stereotypies, avoidance behaviors, or both.
En 1943, dans un article princeps, le psychiatre Leo Kanner decrivait des enfants verbaux et non verbaux, avec des comportements d'indifference sociale et affective, des stereotypies verbales et motrices, et des particularites sensorielles.
Another perspective on the cause of perseveration involves stereotypies or repetitive behavior.
In people with a developmental disorder, the behavior is not part of a pattern of repetitive stereotypies.
The same argument can be made for stereotypies, mannerisms and other repetitive behaviors.
Older ASD children may also demonstrate atypical behaviours such as stereotypies including repetitive hand or finger movements, strange eye gazing, sniffing, licking, persistent toe-walking, rocking and twirling.