steatitis

steatitis

 [ste″ah-ti´tis]
inflammation of fatty tissue; see also panniculitis.

ste·a·ti·tis

(stē'ă-tī'tis),
Inflammation of adipose tissue.
[G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -itis, inflammation]

steatitis

/ste·a·ti·tis/ (ste″ah-ti´tis) inflammation of adipose tissue.

yellow fat disease

A vitamin E deficiency syndrome affecting various mammals, in particular cats, who are fed excess omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oils, especially tuna.

Clinical findings
Greasy, dull coat and flaky skin; severe pain when touched; anorexia, fever. In humans, excess fish-oils cause increased bleeding time, especially after aspirin ingestion, which may play a role in cardiac necrosis and increased susceptibility to catecholamine-induced stress.

Management
Limit intake of tuna; add vitamin E to diet.

ste·a·ti·tis

(stē'ă-tī'tis)
Inflammation of adipose tissue.
[G. stear (steat-), tallow, + -itis, inflammation]

steatitis

inflammation of fatty tissue. See also yellow fat disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
If left untreated steatitis can become very serious and in severe cases can be fatal so it is very important to seek veterinary attention immediately.
This is consistent with the disease in ruminants, as well as disease progression described in humans, where one retrospective report (12) describes 19 of 94 cases requiring bowel resection to treat intestinal obstruction caused by mesenteric steatitis.
Idiopathic mesenteric and omental steatitis in a dog.
Vitamin E deficiency, for example, can result in an extremely painful condition known as steatitis, an inflammation of the fatty tissue.
A case of steatitis and myonecrosis in a donkey foal.
Cats fed excessive amounts of tuna can develop steatitis, where their fat is discoloured with a yellow tinge.
He was also the first to discover that vitamin E prevents steatitis, a serious nutritional disease of mink, swine, and cats.
0 congestion (diffuse) Pancreas: pancreatitis, 0 NA (0) NA adjacent steatitis Abbreviations: EMH indicates extramedullary hematopoiesis; NA, no value available (lesions for all birds sampled in the group had the same value and no variability could be calculated).
Vitamin deficiencies that can lead to significant feline health problems include: vitamin A deficiency, which may cause retarded growth, decline in appetite, eye infections, incoordination and brain damage; lack of vitamin B1 (thiamine), which can result in weight loss and neurologic disorders; vitamin D deficiency, which may cause bone deformity in adults and rickets in kittens, a disease marked by poorly formed, soft and easily broken bones; and vitamin E deficiency, which can cause a disorder called steatitis that may trigger a painful inflammatory response and can damage an animal's body fat.
The birds were diagnosed with steatitis on the basis of the gross lesions and histopathology.
Disease considerations for the swollen and firm caudal coelomic cavity included overfeeding; visceral larval migrans, such as Eustrongyloides species (3,4); steatitis (5,6); foreign body ingestion; or neoplastic mass (eg, nephroblastoma).
A case study: steatitis in great blue herons in Maryland.