statute of limitations


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statute of limitations

[stach′o̅o̅t]
Etymology: L, statuere, to set up, limes, boundary
(in law) a statute that sets a limit of time during which a suit may be brought or criminal charges may be made. In a malpractice suit, dispute may arise as to whether the time set by the particular statute of limitations begins to run at the time of the injury or at the time of the discovery of the injury.

statute of limitations

Malpractice A doctrine that allows a plaintiff 2 to 3 yrs–depending upon the state in the US, from the time of the alleged malpractice or negligence–by a physician or hospital–to file a lawsuit. See Emancipated minor, Malpractice.

Statute of Limitations

the law which limits the time after an event during which a court action related to a claim for damages arising out of the event can be initiated.
References in periodicals archive ?
In introducing the Toussie test, the Court advised that continuing offenses should be found "in only limited circumstances," because "Congress has declared a policy that the statute of limitations should not be extended except as otherwise expressly provided by law.
45) Although the revision suggested the legislature desired to limit agency liability, (46) the 2011 amendment made no changes to the wording of the statute of limitations.
No court of appeals case exists involving the accrual of the statute of limitations under [section] 1962(b).
Turkey has a long history of major criminal cases that were dropped because the statute of limitations had run out.
On appeal, Flagstar unsuccessfully argued that the statute of limitations should not begin to run until the full extent of the alleged damage was discovered.
Courts are apt to closely scrutinize attempts to use the statute of limitations to bar recovery, because this deprives the injured plaintiff of an otherwise legitimate claim.
Before the Hatoyama administration came into being, a Justice Ministry study group said in its report in July that the statute of limitations should be abolished for murder cases.
2000) ("arbitration is not a 'civil action'"--not decided within the context of a statute of limitations issue); Ward v.
There is even a cult TV programme dedicated to the bizarre law called, The Statute of Limitations Police.
If a judge decides the accused would have been liable for child sex abuse charges were it not for the statute of limitations, the defendant's name and photograph will be entered into an Internet database, and he or she will be subject to the thick tangle of legal restrictions that convicted sex offenders face.
Consequently, a request for a return of an advance payment is subject to the strict statute of limitations (SOL) on refund claims.
The high court struck down a state law extending the statute of limitations retroactively in old molestation cases.