status epilepticus


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status

 [sta´tus, stat´us] (L.)
state, particularly in reference to a morbid condition.
absence status sustained clouding of consciousness for several hours, with no interval of normal mental activity, and with few stereotyped movements or no abnormal motor activity.
status asthma´ticus a particularly severe episode of asthma that does not respond adequately to ordinary therapeutic measures and usually requires hospitalization.
status epilep´ticus rapid succession of epileptic spasms without intervals of consciousness; brain damage may result.
status lympha´ticus lymphatism.
performance status ability of a patient to function, as measured by a performance scale.
status thymicolympha´ticus a condition resembling lymphatism, with enlargement of lymphadenoid tissue and of the thymus as the special influencing factor; formerly thought to be the cause of sudden death in children.
status verruco´sus a wartlike appearance of the cerebral cortex, produced by disorderly arrangement of the neuroblasts, so that the formation of fissures and sulci is irregular and unpredictable.
status (omaha) in the omaha system, the condition of the client in relation to objective and subjective defining characteristics.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·'ti·cus

repeated seizure or a seizure prolonged for at least 30 minutes; may be convulsive (tonic-clonic), nonconvulsive (absence or complex partial), partial (epilepsia partialis continuans), or subclinical (electrographic status epilepticus).

status epilepticus

a medical emergency characterized by continuous seizures lasting more than 30 minutes without interruption. Status epilepticus can be precipitated by the sudden withdrawal of anticonvulsant drugs, inadequate body levels of glucose, a brain tumor, a head injury, a high fever, or poisoning. Therapy includes IV administration of anticonvulsant drugs, nutrients, and electrolytes. An adequate airway is usually maintained with a nasopharyngeal or endotracheal tube.

status epilepticus

Neurology
1. Per the Intl League Against Epilepsy–a seizure that persists for a sufficient length of time or is repeated frequently enough that recovery between attacks does not occur.
2. Seizures that persist for 20 to 30 mins, ± a time sufficient to cause injury to CNS neurons.
3. Operational definition-either continuous seizures for 5+ mins or 2 or more discrete seizures without complete recovery of consciousness Etiology-acute Metabolic defects–eg, electrolyte imbalances, renal failure, sepsis, CNS infections, strokes, head trauma, drug toxicity, hypoxia Etiology-chronic Preexisting epilepsy where SE is due to breakthrough seizures or discontinuation of antiepileptics; chronic alcohol abuse; or  tumors or stroke Clinical Initially, Pts are unresponsive and have obvious tonic, clonic, or tonic-clonic movements of the extremities; with time, the clinical findings become more subtle, and require EEG confirmation Management Airway control, monitor vitals–temperature, pulse oximetry, monitor cardiac function, measure glucose, administer thiamine and glucose, begin anticonvulsants Management-anticonvulsants Benzodiazepines–eg, lorazepam, et al, if no response–INR → phenytoin or fosphenytoin, INR → repeat phenytoin or fosphenytoin, INR → phenobarbital, INR → repeat phenobarbital, INR → anesthesia with midazolam or profonol, INR, inter Mortality ± 20%. See Seizure. Cf Serial seizures.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·ti·cus

(stā'tŭs ep-i-lep'ti-kŭs)
Repeated seizure, or a seizure prolonged for at least 30 minutes; may be convulsive (tonic-clonic), nonconvulsive (absence or complex partial), partial (epilepsia partialis continuans), or subclinical (electrographic status epilepticus).

status epilepticus

A repeated sequence of major epileptic seizures (grand mal) without recovery of consciousness between attacks. The condition is dangerous and may prove fatal unless controlled. Diazepam or more powerful drugs are given by intravenous injection.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·ti·cus

(stā'tŭs ep-i-lep'ti-kŭs)
Repeated seizures or a seizure of at least 30 minutes.

status

[L.] condition, state.

status asthmaticus
asthmatic crisis; a sudden, intense and continuous asthmatic attack with dyspnea, gagging and cyanosis. May be seen in feline bronchial asthma.
status epilepticus
rapid succession of epileptic spasms without intervals of consciousness; brain damage may result.
status spongiosum
see spongy degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty patients with the diagnosis of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) were included in the study.
Patient Age Gender Etiology number 1 39 M Viral meningoencephalitis 2 72 M Cardiac arrest 3 82 F Prolonged hypoxemia due to pneumonia 4 53 M Viral encephalitis Patient Diagnosis EEG findings number 1 Status Burst suppression epilepticus 2 Postanoxic Burst suppression encephalopathy 3 Postanoxic Burst suppression encephalopathy 4 Status epilepticus Burst suppression Patient Antiepileptic number medications 1 Midazolam IV * 2 None 3 Midazolam IV * 4 Midazolam IV * M: male; F: female; IV *: intravenous continuous infusion.
El caso reportado por nosotros puede considerarse el primero en las Americas con afectacion a nivel del sistema nervioso central, con una evolucion mas complicada y dificil resolucion del status epilepticus.
Acute seizure status epilepticus and traumatic brain injuries were the most common reasons for PICU admissions in USA.
In the United States the Febrile Status Epilepticus Study (FEBSTAT) demonstrated significant diversity, not only in home therapy for those with recurrent events but by emergency services for initial treatment of SE.
The primary efficacy outcome was cessation of status epilepticus by 10 minutes with no recurrence by 30 minutes.
Practice parameter: Diagnostic assessment of the child with status epilepticus (an evidence-based review): Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.
A diagnosis of complex partial status epilepticus was reported according to the EEG recording (Fig.
When combining the results of the 4 years of the study, the causes of death in the HIV-positive patients included meningitis (58%), strokes (14%), space-occupying lesions (8%), status epilepticus (7%) and PML (5%) (Fig.
In animal studies, inducing status epilepticus in an otherwise healthy animal can cause them to become epileptic.
Status epilepticus causes necrotic damage in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in immature rats.
Current concepts in neurology: management of status epilepticus.