status epilepticus


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status

 [sta´tus, stat´us] (L.)
state, particularly in reference to a morbid condition.
absence status sustained clouding of consciousness for several hours, with no interval of normal mental activity, and with few stereotyped movements or no abnormal motor activity.
status asthma´ticus a particularly severe episode of asthma that does not respond adequately to ordinary therapeutic measures and usually requires hospitalization.
status epilep´ticus rapid succession of epileptic spasms without intervals of consciousness; brain damage may result.
status lympha´ticus lymphatism.
performance status ability of a patient to function, as measured by a performance scale.
status thymicolympha´ticus a condition resembling lymphatism, with enlargement of lymphadenoid tissue and of the thymus as the special influencing factor; formerly thought to be the cause of sudden death in children.
status verruco´sus a wartlike appearance of the cerebral cortex, produced by disorderly arrangement of the neuroblasts, so that the formation of fissures and sulci is irregular and unpredictable.
status (omaha) in the omaha system, the condition of the client in relation to objective and subjective defining characteristics.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·'ti·cus

repeated seizure or a seizure prolonged for at least 30 minutes; may be convulsive (tonic-clonic), nonconvulsive (absence or complex partial), partial (epilepsia partialis continuans), or subclinical (electrographic status epilepticus).

status epilepticus

a medical emergency characterized by continuous seizures lasting more than 30 minutes without interruption. Status epilepticus can be precipitated by the sudden withdrawal of anticonvulsant drugs, inadequate body levels of glucose, a brain tumor, a head injury, a high fever, or poisoning. Therapy includes IV administration of anticonvulsant drugs, nutrients, and electrolytes. An adequate airway is usually maintained with a nasopharyngeal or endotracheal tube.

status epilepticus

Neurology
1. Per the Intl League Against Epilepsy–a seizure that persists for a sufficient length of time or is repeated frequently enough that recovery between attacks does not occur.
2. Seizures that persist for 20 to 30 mins, ± a time sufficient to cause injury to CNS neurons.
3. Operational definition-either continuous seizures for 5+ mins or 2 or more discrete seizures without complete recovery of consciousness Etiology-acute Metabolic defects–eg, electrolyte imbalances, renal failure, sepsis, CNS infections, strokes, head trauma, drug toxicity, hypoxia Etiology-chronic Preexisting epilepsy where SE is due to breakthrough seizures or discontinuation of antiepileptics; chronic alcohol abuse; or  tumors or stroke Clinical Initially, Pts are unresponsive and have obvious tonic, clonic, or tonic-clonic movements of the extremities; with time, the clinical findings become more subtle, and require EEG confirmation Management Airway control, monitor vitals–temperature, pulse oximetry, monitor cardiac function, measure glucose, administer thiamine and glucose, begin anticonvulsants Management-anticonvulsants Benzodiazepines–eg, lorazepam, et al, if no response–INR → phenytoin or fosphenytoin, INR → repeat phenytoin or fosphenytoin, INR → phenobarbital, INR → repeat phenobarbital, INR → anesthesia with midazolam or profonol, INR, inter Mortality ± 20%. See Seizure. Cf Serial seizures.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·ti·cus

(stā'tŭs ep-i-lep'ti-kŭs)
Repeated seizure, or a seizure prolonged for at least 30 minutes; may be convulsive (tonic-clonic), nonconvulsive (absence or complex partial), partial (epilepsia partialis continuans), or subclinical (electrographic status epilepticus).

status epilepticus

A repeated sequence of major epileptic seizures (grand mal) without recovery of consciousness between attacks. The condition is dangerous and may prove fatal unless controlled. Diazepam or more powerful drugs are given by intravenous injection.

sta·tus ep·i·lep·ti·cus

(stā'tŭs ep-i-lep'ti-kŭs)
Repeated seizures or a seizure of at least 30 minutes.

status

[L.] condition, state.

status asthmaticus
asthmatic crisis; a sudden, intense and continuous asthmatic attack with dyspnea, gagging and cyanosis. May be seen in feline bronchial asthma.
status epilepticus
rapid succession of epileptic spasms without intervals of consciousness; brain damage may result.
status spongiosum
see spongy degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early EEG monitoring for detecting postanoxic status epilepticus during therapeutic hypothermia: A pilot study.
A prospective, population-based epidemiologic study of status epilepticus in Richmond, Virginia.
The most common clinical features observed during complex partial status epilepticus are confusion, hallucinations, mutism, anxiety, and variable amnesia.
While the medical protocol for convulsive status has been well defined, therapy for focal status epilepticus is more ambiguous.
If they do not, the condition becomes status epilepticus, continuous unrelenting seizures that can lead to brain damage - or even death - if not treated.
Several acquired disorders, such as bacterial meningitis (2), cerebral hypoxia (3), and status epilepticus (4), can increase the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentration.
The more soluble prodrug, fosphenytoin, was recently introduced to avoid PTN's side effects, and has since become first-line therapy for status epilepticus in the emergency department.
The first symptom of the disease in the majority of the patients was development of seizures, and 20% presented with status epilepticus.
Phenytoin-induced movement disorder associated with intravenous administration for status epilepticus.
As with all Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ONFI should be gradually withdrawn to minimize the risk of precipitating seizures, seizure exacerbation or status epilepticus.
The goal of rescue therapy for seizure clusters is to quickly administer an effective treatment that will rapidly cease the seizure cluster so that it doesn't progress to status epilepticus," said Barry Gidal, PharmD, RPH, Professor of Pharmacy and Neurology, University of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy.
PGTC seizures also increase the risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) and are known to lead to absence status epilepticus (ASE), seizures that last for extended time periods.