stasis


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stasis

 [sta´sis]
a stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid, or of intestinal contents.
stasis syndrome overgrowth of bacteria within the small intestine resulting from a variety of conditions causing stasis, particularly disturbances to intestinal motility or decreased acid secretion, but also structural abnormalities such as diverticula, fistulae between the colon and upper bowel, or chronic obstruction; it is characterized by malabsorption of vitamin B12, steatorrhea, and anemia.
venous stasis cessation or impairment of venous flow, such as with venous insufficiency; see also stasis ulcer. Called also phlebostasis and venostasis.

sta·sis

, pl.

sta·ses

(stā'sis, stas'is; -ēz),
Stagnation of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]

stasis

/sta·sis/ (sta´sis)
1. a stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid.
2. a state of equilibrium among opposing forces.stat´ic

intestinal stasis  impairment of the normal passage of intestinal contents, due to mechanical obstruction or to impaired intestinal motility.
urinary stasis  stoppage of the flow or discharge of urine, at any level of the urinary tract.
venous stasis  impairment or cessation of venous flow.

stasis

(stā′sĭs, stăs′ĭs)
n. pl. stases (stā′sēz, stăs′ēz)
1. A condition of balance among various forces; motionlessness: "Language is a primary element of culture, and stasis in the arts is tantamount to death" (Charles Marsh).
2. Medicine Stoppage of the normal flow of a body substance, as of blood through an artery or of intestinal contents through the bowels.

stasis

[stā′sis, stas′is]
Etymology: Gk, standing
1 a disorder in which the normal flow of a fluid through a vessel of the body is slowed or halted.
2 stillness.

stasis

A block in flow, usually of the peripheral circulation. See Venous stasis.

sta·sis

(stā'sis)
Stoppage of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]

stasis

A reduction or cessation of flow, as of blood or intestinal contents.

stasis

  1. an apparent stability, particularly in the fossil record of a particular organism, where no evolutionary change is seen over a long period of time.
  2. a period of lack of growth or its slowing in an organism.
  3. the slowing or cessation or movement of bodily fluids in animals.

stasis

reduction of normal arterial perfusion/ venous drainage, with associated oedema, cyanosis and congestion of subserved tissues

sta·sis

(stā'sis)
Stagnation of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]

stasis

a stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid, or of intestinal contents.

gastric stasis
reduced motility, without primary organic disease, leading to retention of gastric contents; may be a cause of vomiting. Can be caused by stress, trauma, ulcers, peritonitis and gastritis.
urine stasis
may be caused by abnormalities in structure or innervation of the urinary outflow tract that result in incomplete emptying of the bladder or pooling of urine in diverticula. Important in the etiology of cystitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the concurrent occurrence of psoriasis, stasis dermatitis (venous ulcer), and KS has not been previously reported.
For the near term-the next 20, 30, 40 years-we can work with something like two weeks' stasis capability," Bradford reportedly said.
The possible pathophysiology behind the enterolithiasis is the stasis of digestive juices and food particles between the strictures.
After 7 days of acclimation, the animals were transferred to individual metabolic cages and randomly divided into the following three groups with six rats per group: (1) healthy control group, (2) blood stasis model group, (3) puerarin pretreatment group.
Comparison of Baseline Data between Groups: There was no significant difference among the healthy control group (Control) the blood stasis syndrome group (BSS) and the non-blood stasis syndrome group (NBSS) in age body mass index (BMI) menopausal time and smoking history (Pgreater than 0.
In order to resolve the crisis set forth by the krinomenon, it is a common practice in stasis scholarship to argue for the use of topoi as they are understood by Aristotle.
The treatment techniques used were based on subjective assessment of the severity of crop distension and stasis.
According to Stasis, such fear tactics did not deter the angry citizens, who have been protesting every night at the Presidential Palace for more than forty days, from exercising their right to freedom of speech.
In The Paris Sketchbook (1840), Thackeray offers refuge from the clamor of the modern world through the narrative persona of Titmarsh, who becomes an avatar of stasis and tradition against a sordid background of capitalist getting and spending.
This important point is not new, but held in connection with the military stasis thesis it has considerable policy relevance.
Entendiendo las dos obras como una sola (1) podemos decir que Loraux empieza por el final al analizar antes las consecuencias de la stasis que la propia stasis.