squamate


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Related to squamate: order Squamata

squamate

(skwā′māt′, skwä′-)
n.
Any of various reptiles of the order Squamata, which includes the lizards, snakes, and worm lizards.
adj.
1. Of or relating to reptiles of the order Squamata.
2. Of or relating to squamae.

squa·mous

(skwā'mŭs)
Relating to or covered with scales.
Synonym(s): scaly, squamate.
[L. squamosus]

squamous

; squamate scaly; capable of desquamation
References in periodicals archive ?
Squamates are vertebrates (organisms with a backbone) that don't have bodily processes for controlling their internal temperature.
Chelicerae: Paturon relatively long, sometimes elongate, proximally constricted; cuticle finely reticulated or squamate.
Area of habitat was correlated with abundances of nine species of squamates in the patchy Florida scrub (McCoy and Mushinsky, 1999).
chlorophaea (n = 62) in Washington is within the range of what is considered normal for snakes and squamate reptiles as a group (Porter, 1967; Huey and Bennett, 1987; Peterson et al.
Pyron had previously analyzed an evolutionary tree containing all groups of squamates, the group that comprises lizards and snakes.
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between flicking of the tongue and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS; see Young, 1993), Electrophysiological data have demonstrated a close temporal correlation between the activity pattern of the tongue retractor system and stimulation of the sensory receptors in the vomeronasal organs (VNO; Meredith & Burghardt, 1978).
The evolution of helodermatid squamates, with descriptions of a new taxon and an overview of the Varanoidea.
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between extrusion of the tongue (tongue flick behavior) and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS).
Griggs Assistant Professor of Biology in GW's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, along with researchers from the City University of New York and Arizona State University, detail the cataloguing of 4,161 species of snakes and lizards, or squamates.
Note that the living anurans (frogs and toads), birds, and turtles are not listed below, and only the orders of living (Mod, modern) salamanders, squamates, and mammals that are also recovered in the cave are listed.