spurge

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Related to spurges: Monadenium

spurge

see euphorbia, phyllanthusabnormis.

spurge flax
daphnemezereum.
spurge laurel
daphne spp.
spurge olive
daphnemezereum.
References in periodicals archive ?
TIP OF THE WEEK: One of the toughest indoor spurges, which may even survive occasionally on a well-enclosed outdoor patio, is croton (Codiaeum variegatum).
Now, German biochemists offer more reason to handle spurges with care.
Many of these weeds-such as leafy spurge, Euphorbia esula L, and yellow starthistle, Centaurea solstitialis-are thought to have originated in Europe and been brought here more than a century ago by immigrants who packed plants onto their ships when they set sail for America.
One of the best spurges, which will thrive happily in shade, is euphorbia martinii, a hybrid between euphorbia amygdaloides, our native wood spurge, and the glaucous Mediterranean euphorbia characias or wulfenii.
Everyone needs a few snowdrops to gladden the heart in winter | Everyone needs a few snowdrops to gladden the heart in winter | Main picture by JONATHAN BUCKLEY | Main picture by JONATHAN BUCKLEY | Euphorbia amygdaloides | Euphorbia amygdaloides will thrive happily in shade, is Euphorbia martinii, a hybrid between Euphorbia amygdaloides, our native wood spurge, and the glaucous Mediterranean Euphorbia characias or wulfenii.
From Turkey and the Middle East, where it grows on arid mountainsides, this spurge has close-packed glaucous leaves, slightly pointed, which spiral thickly round its dangling stems.
Spotted prostrate spurge takes over just when you have declared victory over petty spurge (Euphorbia peplus), its cool-weather cousin.
The key to controlling leafy spurge in this country is importing insects and diseases from the native land of spurges to infest the various leafy spurge types.
Ajuga, the bugle, with blue flowers in spring and summer Bergenia, the winter-flowering 'pigsqueak' with elephant-ear leaves and pink blooms Brunnera or Anchusa, with small blue May flowers Euphorbia robbiae, one of the cultivated spurges, flowering yellow or green, also in May Hostas, one of the most effective shade plants with variegated and white or mauve flowers Iris foetidissima, with purple flowers in June and red seeds Lamium maculatum, one of the dead-nettles but attractive for all that.
There are some hardy species, commonly referred to as spurges, many with acid green or yellow flowers (actually bracts) eg euphorbia myrsinites and E.
If you have a well-established allotment, you may well have one of the weed euphorbias, commonly known as spurges growing happily amongst your potatoes.