sporogenesis


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spo·rog·o·ny

(spō-rog'ŏ-nē),
The formation of sporozoites in sporozoan protozoa, a process of asexual division within the sporoblast, which becomes the sporocyst within an oocyst; follows fusion of gametes (gametogony) and zygote (sporont) formation.
Synonym(s): sporogenesis, sporogeny
[sporo- + G. goneia, generation]

sporogenesis

(spôr′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. Production or formation of spores.
2. Reproduction by means of spores.

spo′ro·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk), spo·rog′e·nous (spə-rŏj′ə-nəs, spô-, spō-) adj.

sporogenesis

[spôr′ōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, sporos + genesis, origin
1 the formation of spores. Also called sporogeny.
2 reproduction by means of spores. sporogenic, adj.

spo·rog·o·ny

, sporogeny (spŏr-og'ŏ-nē, -oj'ĕ-nē)
The formation of sporozoites in sporozoan protozoa, a process of asexual division within the sporoblast, which becomes the sporocyst within an oocyst; follows fusion of gametes (gametogony) and zygote (sporont) formation.
Synonym(s): sporogenesis.
[sporo- + G. goneia, generation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Regular arrangements of mitochondria and plastids during sporogenesis in Equisetum.
Ultrastructural investigations on sporogenesis in Equisetum fluviatile.
A study of the cytoplasmic inclusions during sporogenesis in Onoclea sensibilis.
Comparative studies of sporogenesis including the mechanisms of meiosis, cytokinesis, and spore wall elaboration provide valuable information leading to a better understanding of evolutionary relationships among major groups of primitive land plants (Blackmore & Knox, 1990).
One of the least understood aspects of sporogenesis is how the living cytoplasm of a single cell controls the intricate patterning of the sporopollenin-containing sporoderm.
The preliminary findings on sporogenesis suggest that there are variations that may be of taxonomic importance in resolving relationships in this diverse group.
Sporogenesis in Aneura was first studied about the time that meiosis in plants was first described in the late 1800s.
This, at least in some taxa, results in a prolonged period of sporogenesis with successive stages in longitudinal files of cells progressing from mitosis to mature spores.
However, as is typical of sporogenesis in bryophytes, the phragmoplast does not function in the deposition of a dyad wall and second division spindles develop simultaneously between plastids in the undivided cytoplasm.
Sporogenesis and the female gametophyte of Phormium tenax.