spore


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spore

 [spor]
1. a refractile, oval body formed within bacteria, especially Bacillus and Clostridium, which is regarded as a resting stage during the life history of the cell, and is characterized by its resistance to environmental changes.
2. the reproductive element, produced sexually or asexually, of one of the lower organisms, such as protozoa, fungi, or algae.

spore

(spōr),
1. The asexual or sexual reproductive body of fungi or sporozoan protozoa.
2. A cell of a plant lower in organization than the seed-bearing spermatophytic plants.
3. A resistant form of certain species of bacteria.
4. The highly modified reproductive body of certain protozoa, as in the phyla Microspora and Myxozoa.
[G. sporos, seed]

spore

(spor)
1. a refractile, oval body formed within bacteria, especially Bacillus and Clostridium, which is regarded as a resting stage during the life history of the cell, and is characterized by its resistance to environmental changes.
2. the reproductive element, produced sexually or asexually, of one of the lower organisms, such as protozoa, fungi, algae, etc.

spore

(spôr)
n.
1. A small, usually single-celled reproductive body that is resistant to adverse environmental conditions and is capable of growing into a new organism, produced especially by certain fungi, algae, protozoans, and nonseedbearing plants such as mosses and ferns.
2. A megaspore or microspore.
3. A dormant nonreproductive body formed by certain bacteria often in response to a lack of nutrients, and characteristically being highly resistant to heat, desiccation, and destruction by chemicals or enzymes.
intr.v. spored, sporing, spores
To produce spores.

spore

Etymology: Gk, sporos, seed
1 a reproductive unit of some genera of fungi or protozoa.
2 a form assumed by some bacteria that is resistant to heat, drying, and chemicals. Under proper environmental conditions the spore may revert to the actively multiplying form of the bacterium. Diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria include anthrax, botulism, gas gangrene, and tetanus.

spore

(spōr)
1. The asexual or sexual reproductive body of fungi or sporozoan protozoa.
2. A cell of a plant lower in organization than the seed-bearing spermatophytic plants.
3. A resistant form of certain species of bacteria.
4. The highly modified reproductive body of certain protozoa, as in the phyla Microspora and Myxozoa.
[G. sporos, seed]

spore

1. A dormant or resting stage of certain bacteria and other organisms, capable of surviving for long periods in hostile environments and of reactivating under suitable conditions.
2. A single-celled propagative form of a fungus capable of developing into an adult.

spore

a reproductive body consisting of one or several cells formed by cell division in the parent organism, which, when detached and dispersed, and if conditions are suitable,germinates into a new individual. Spores occur particularly in fungi and bacteria and also in Protozoa. Some have thick, resistant walls which enable them to overcome unfavourable conditions such as drought. Usually they are produced in very large numbers, and occur as a result of either sexual or asexual reproduction.

Spore

A dormant form assumed by some bacteria, such as anthrax, that enable the bacterium to survive high temperatures, dryness, and lack of nourishment for long periods of time. Under proper conditions, the spore may revert to the actively multiplying form of the bacteria.

spore

asexual reproductive body of a fungus

spore

quiescent form, adopted by some bacteria in adverse conditions

spore

(spōr)
1. The asexual or sexual reproductive body of fungi or sporozoan protozoa.
2. A resistant form of some species of bacteria.
[G. sporos, seed]

spore,

n 1. a reproductive unit of some genera of fungi and protozoa.
2. a form assumed by some bacteria that is resistant to heat, drying, and chemicals. Diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria include anthrax, botulism, gas gangrene, and tetanus.
spore testing,
n a procedure in which test strips or receptacles containing microorganisms are checked for positive color changes or negative growth to verify that a sterilization technique is effective. See also B. stearothermophilus.

spore

1. a refractile, oval or spherical body formed within bacteria, especially Bacillus and Clostridium spp., usually under adverse conditions such as nutritional deprivation, and which is regarded as a fully infectious, resting stage during the life cycle of the cell. Spores are inactive metabolically, highly resistant to environmental changes and may survive, for example in soil, for many years. Bacterial spores come in various shapes and are given illustrative names such as drumstick, terminal and subterminal.
2. the reproductive element, produced sexually or asexually, of organisms, such as protozoa, fungi or algae.

spore former
a bacteria or other small life form that forms spores.
References in periodicals archive ?
This simple trap could help with the determination of phenological processes in tropical environments and thus address future challenges, including understanding the possible consequences of global warming on ferns and their spore dispersal (Mehltreter, 2008).
The variability in spores may be due to failed divisions of the vegetative stages (Andreadis & Hanula 1987), an unknown effect of the adult beetle's immune system, death of spores, or some unknown factor.
In general, at all temperatures, the production of spores initially grew slowly and gradually up to 27 days of cultivation, with a sharp increase up to 76 days, and thereafter, spore production stabilized.
The SARC SPORE research will also focus on molecularly-driven diagnostic approaches to improve early detection of primary as well as metastatic/recurrent sarcoma.
Authors of the earlier study said their finding "might provide new tools to combat mycobacterial diseases such as tuberculosis by preventing the disease itself and/or its transmission by spores.
Mold spore concentrations in all of the samples were high to very high according to NAB national benchmarks (NAB 2006a), ranging from approximately 21,000 to 102,000 spores/[m.
Many spore walls exhibit fissures near the ends of the spores (Fig.
Next comes something called the "hygiene hypothesis," which holds that because we're exposed to fewer germs while we're young--through our emphasis on cleanliness, overuse of antibiotics, and immunizations--our immune systems never learn the difference between benign invaders like mold spores and dangerous invaders like bacteria.
We also assumed that by day 7, outdoor contamination would have subsided to the point where it did not affect indoor spore concentrations.
To confirm that the ELISA results were not attributable to biotinylation of contaminants of the spore preparation, an ELISA was done in another format, with antibodies specific for B.
These spores generated are carried by air currents to new areas that may be favorable for their growth