splenic rupture


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splenic rupture

An abdominal catastrophe marked by severe, often pleuritic pain, hemodynamic instability, blood loss into the peritoneum, and occasionally cardiovascular collapse and death. It may occur as a result of trauma or rarely in patients with infectious mononucleosis. Treatment may be conservative or may involve removal of the spleen. In delayed rupture of the spleen, a catastrophic illness may not present until days or weeks after the causative injury.
See also: rupture

splenic

pertaining to the spleen.

splenic abscess
caused by hematogenous spread of an infection elsewhere, by penetration by a foreign body from the reticulum in cattle, by ulceration from the stomach in the horse. Manifested by fever and toxemia, pain on palpation over the spleen and by a positive paracentesis sample.
splenic artery
see Table 9.
splenic corpuscle
lymph nodules in the splenic matrix.
splenic displacement
may be detectable on palpation. Usually caused by displacement of the stomach or intestine to which the spleen is attached.
splenic enlargement
splenic fever
anthrax.
splenic hyperfunction
splenic meridian points
acupuncture points situated along the splenic meridian.
splenic phosphodiesterase
a ribonuclease that is a 5′→3′ exonuclease.
splenic rupture
only likely in a grossly enlarged spleen, e.g. in bovine viral leukosis.
splenic torsion
a twisting or rotation of the spleen on its vascular pedicle, often in association with gastric dilatation-volvulus in large breed dogs, results in primarily venous congestion and possibly thrombosis and infarction. Clinical signs include abdominal distention and pain, vomiting, and in acute cases cardiovascular collapse and shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, pictures of recurrent splenic rupture and following severe intra-abdominal bleeding, hypotension and shock have been reported in these patients in the literature.
In our case splenic rupture was initially not included in the differential diagnosis, as it is a rare complication in modern medicine.
Co-existence of spontaneous splenic rupture and tuberculosis of the spleen.
Abdominal pain is rare in the presence of splenomegaly, so its onset should alert the clinician to the possibility of splenic rupture, as it did in our case.
There was no correlation between severity of illness and susceptibility to splenic rupture.
To date there has been few reported cases of splenic rupture following the administration of thrombolytic agents(5-8).
As a result, splenic rupture may be missed or diagnosed late.
Splenic rupture following infarction has not yet been described.
There has been some speculation that splenomegaly associated with infectious mononucleosis increases the risk of splenic rupture in sports, especially among college-aged males.
There has been speculation that splenomegaly associated with infectious mononucleosis increases the risk of splenic rupture in sports, especially among college-aged males.
A rare but important presentation of splenic angiosarcoma is spontaneous splenic rupture (13%).