spirochetosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to spirochetosis: intestinal spirochetosis

spirochetosis

 [spi″ro-ke-to´sis]
infection with spirochetes.

spi·ro·che·to·sis

(spī'rō-kē-tō'sis),
Any disease caused by a spirochete.

spirochetosis

/spi·ro·che·to·sis/ (-ke-to´sis) infection with spirochetes.

spirochetosis

(spī′rə-kē-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. spirocheto·ses (-sēz)
Any of various diseases, such as syphilis, caused by infection with spirochetes.

spirochetosis

1. an infectious disease of many species of fowl caused by Borrelia anserina and characterized by fever, cyanosis of the head and diarrhea. It is transmitted by the fowl ticks Argas persicus, A. miniatus and A. reflexus. Morbidity and mortality are very variable but may reach 100%.
2. a benign venereal disease of rabbits caused by Brachyspiraparaluis-cuniculi, characterized by small vesicles, scabs or ulcers which heal in 10 to 14 days. The lesions are confined to the genitalia, with a few animals also having lesions on the eyelids and lips. Called also rabbit syphilis, treponematosis, vent disease.
3. leptospirosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings are supportive of those described by De Brito and colleagues, (4) who described the cross-reactivity of the spirochetes of intestinal spirochetosis with both anti-T pallidum and antiLeptospira interrogans antibodies.
Comparative pathology and pathogenesis of naturally acquired and experimentally induced colonic spirochetosis.
Since then, other reports have demonstrated a direct relationship between the incidence of spirochetosis and rapidly growing industrial towns, homosexual men and patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (2).
Few reports in the literature (amounting to less than 30 patients) have described patients with intestinal spirochetosis who presented with a clinical and histological picture of acute appendicitis (8,9).
No consensus guidelines for the treatment of intestinal spirochetosis exists as only successful case reports of trial antibiotic regimens have been described.
The original case of spirochetosis could not be confirmed, but 4 other spirochete-positive biopsies were found, 1 with adenovirus coinfection (Figure, E).
Spirochetosis can be a difficult histologic diagnosis that can be confused with a prominent brush border or totally overlooked.
Diarrhea is the most common symptom, although in most patients with diarrhea, spirochetosis is an incidental finding.
Ulcerative and pustular lesions have been described in 2 patients with invasive gastrointestinal spirochetosis.
pilosicoli strains found in cholera patients were extremely diverse relative to the known outgroup species, which indicates the potential for detection of new species related to intestinal spirochetosis.
The pathophysiology of intestinal spirochetosis in this setting and its relevance to human health remain unknown.
Pathogenicity of human and porcine intestinal spirochaetes in day-old specific pathogen free chicks: an animal model of intestinal spirochetosis.