spirochete


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spirochete

 [spi´ro-kēt]
a highly coiled bacterium; a general term applied to any organism of the order Spirochaetales, which includes the genera Borrelia, Leptospira, and Treponema. Spirochetes are the causative organisms of syphilis, yaws, lyme disease, and various other diseases. adj., adj spiroche´tal.

spi·ro·chete

(spī'rō-kēt),
A vernacular term used to refer to any organism resembling a Leptospira, Spirochaeta, or Treponema cell.

spirochete

/spi·ro·chete/ (spi´ro-kēt)
1. any microorganism of the order Spirochaetales.
2. an organism of the genus Spirochaeta. spiroche´tal

spirochete

(spī′rə-kēt′)
n.
Any of various slender, spiral, motile bacteria of the order Spirochaetales, many of which are pathogenic, causing syphilis, relapsing fever, yaws, and other diseases.

spi′ro·chet′al (-kēt′l) adj.

spirochete

[spī′rəkēt′]
Etymology: Gk, speira, coil, chaite, hair
any bacterium of the genus Spirochaeta that is motile and spiral-shaped with flexible filaments. Kinds of spirochetes include the organisms responsible for leptospirosis, relapsing fever, syphilis, and yaws. Also spelled spirochaete. Compare Bacillus, coccus, vibrio. spirochetal, adj.

spi·ro·chete

(spī'rō-kēt)
A vernacular term used to refer to any organism resembling a Leptospira, Spirochaeta, or Treponema cell.

Spirochete

Any of a family of spiral- or coil-shaped bacteria known as Spirochetae. L. interrogans is a spirochete, as well as the organisms that cause syphilis and relapsing fever.

spi·ro·chete

(spī'rō-kēt)
A vernacular term used to refer to any organism resembling a Leptospira, Spirochaeta, or Treponema cell.

spirochete (spī´rəkēt´),

n a bacterium of the genus
Spirochaeta that is motile and spiral shaped with flexible filaments. They include the organisms responsible for leprosy, relapsing fever, syphilis, and yaws.

spirochete

1. a highly coiled bacterium; a general term applied to any organism of the order Spirochaetales, which includes the causative organisms of human syphilis (Treponema pallidum), of avian spirochetosis (Borrelia anserina) and rabbit spirochetosis (Treponema paraluiscuniculi), and associated with swine dysentery (Brachyspirahyodysenteriae) and footrot of sheep.
2. an organism of the genus Spirochaeta.
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple herbal antimicrobials addressing bacteria, fungi, viruses, and spirochetes also exhibit antitumor activity, making them effective in the treatment of cancer and MSCIS.
Although relapsing fever spirochetes from southern Iran and those from borreliae in Africa have a close phylogenetic similarity, they have different virulence levels and abilities to infect vector and host species.
Comparing the relative potential of rodents as reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete.
Each DNA extract revealing a positive spirochete signal was again amplified with a second set of specific primers: C90/C75.
The spirochetes enter the body when an infected tick attaches to the skin to take a blood meal.
These include direct observation of the spirochete by dark field microscopy, and both nontreponemal and treponemal serologic antibody studies.
Sera were examined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western immunoblot assay using whole cell preparations as antigen to detect equine IgG antibodies to the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi.
Some scientists believe that an infectious bacterium, called a spirochete, may cause the changes in the immune system that lead to lichen sclerosus.
Researchers eventually fingered corkscrew-shaped bacteria: a spirochete called Borrelia burgdorferi and closely related species.
Lyme disease is caused by a spirochete, a corkscrew-shaped bacterium named Borrelia burgdorferi.
Among known Lyme patients, they contend, only rarely does the Lyme spirochete (the bacterium that causes the disease) survive a course of oral antibiotics--and intravenous antibiotic therapy is thus rarely indicated--if at all.
In fact, the Lyme disease spirochete has been isolated from virtually all blood-sucking insects: deer tick, brown dog tick, lone star tick, American dog tick (also mentioned by Potter), black-legged tick, Western black-legged tick, dog flea, cat flea, rodent flea, bot fly, horse fly, deer fly, and at least 15 species of mosquito.