spinoglenoid

spi·no·gle·noid

(spī'nō-glē'noyd),
Relating to the spine and the glenoid cavity of the scapula.

spinoglenoid

(spī″nō-glĕn′oyd) [″ + Gr. glene, socket, + eidos, form, shape]
Rel. to the spine of the scapula and the glenoid cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nerve then passes deep to this muscle in the supraspinatus fossa continuing into the spinoglenoid notch and terminates in the infraspinatus muscle.
Injury of the suprascapular nerve at the spinoglenoid notch.
They are usually identified by the distinct combination of muscle bellies involved: Suprascapular nerve entrapment at the suprascapular notch affects the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles; suprascapular nerve entrapment at the level of the spinoglenoid notch (distal to supraspinatus motor innervation) affects only the infraspinatus muscle; quadrilateral space syndrome (compression of the axillary nerve in the quadrilateral space) usually affects just the teres minor muscle; and ParsonageTurner Syndrome, an acute brachial neuritis, can involve single or multiple nerve distributions (Figure 10).
The technique chosen was that described by Meier, which allows blockade of the suprascapular nerve during its passage from the suprascapular notch to the spinoglenoid notch, as it lies in the lateral supraspinous grooves (19,20).
Suprascapular nerve block at the spinoglenoid notch.
Palpation of tissues in the region of the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches may elicit local tenderness and occasionally a deep non-specific ache over the scapula and glenohumeral joint.
1) Two anatomical sites described in literature where the suprascapular nerve can be entrapped are at the level of the suprascapular notch and at the spinoglenoid notch.
Aiello I, Serra G, Traina GC, Tugnoli V: Entrapment of the suprascapular nerve at the spinoglenoid notch.
Suprascapular nerve entrapment at the spinoglenoid notch secondary to a ganglion cyst.
MR arthrography findings suggestive of a SLAP lesion include: contrast extending into the long head of the biceps insertion on the oblique sagittal and oblique coronal images; irregularity of the long head of the biceps insertion on the oblique sagittal and oblique coronal images; contrast extending between the labrum and the glenoid on the axial images; displacement of the superior labrum on oblique sagittal and oblique coronal images; displacement of a fragment of the labrum between the humeral head and glenoid fossa; and presence of a glenoid labral cyst in the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch.