spinal instability

spi·nal in·sta·bil·i·ty

the inability of the spinal column, under physiologic loading, to maintain its normal configuration; can result from congenital defects, trauma, degenerative change, or neoplastic diseases affecting the vertebrae, intervertebral discs, or spinal ligaments; may lead to damage to the spinal cord or nerve roots or to painful spinal deformity.

spi·nal in·sta·bil·i·ty

(spī'năl in'stă-bil'i-tē)
The inability of the spinal column, under physiologic loads, to maintain its normal configuration; may result in damage to the spinal cord or nerve roots or lead to the development of a painful spinal deformity.
References in periodicals archive ?
4 Radiotherapy is the most common therapy; but it cannot improve neurological function, especially spinal paralysis, by relieving spinal instability induced by tumors.
Concept of spinal instability is determined by considering the severity of the spinal damage and adopting a management strategy, as according to various authors, unstable spinal fractures require surgical intervention.
6m Series D equity financing to expand commercialisation of the VMA (Vertebral Motion Analysis) technology, the company's flagship product for the radiographic assessment of spinal instability and alignment, the company said.
Short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with cement augmentation for tumor-induced spinal instability.
The subsequent prone position and the posterior facetectomies may have contributed to a degree of spinal instability and alteration of the kyphoscoliotic angle.
Some of them include herpes zoster, infection, lumbar nerve root tumor, spinal instability, excessive hypertrophy of the facet joint, ankylosing spondylitis, sacroiliitis, sciatic neuritis, piriformis syndrome, intrapelvic mass (hypertrophic ossification), intraspinal ganglion cyst, endometriosis, adenomyosis, coxarthrosis, et cetera.
I suffer from severe spinal instability with my spine partially dislocating in three places hundreds of times each day - even from just lifting my head off the pillow.
Wheeler explores the relationship between pain, spinal instability, muscle weakness and mobility keeping sufferers locked in a cycle of recurring pain.
Excluded the patients more than 50 years old, an infection, spinal instability, hepatic or renal disease, severe cardiac disease, or bleeding abnormalities and those undergoing revision surgery, more than 2 levels or requiring stabilisation or fusion.