dayflower

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dayflower

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb native to Asia, which is diuretic and has been used for diarrhoea, flu, urinary infections and sore throats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asteraceae), Ohio spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis Raf.
Webster, in ARS's Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, at Tifton, Georgia, and university colleagues came up with this Earth-friendly, sustainable strategy for sidestepping spiderwort.
Spiderwort leaves are diamonds of silky green, arranged alternately along the stem, and spiderwort flowers are as true blue as any you will see.
It's multiflora rose blooming season, privet blooming season, yellow poplar blooming season and spiderwort season.
Petals of pink, purple, and blue from blossoms and buds of iris and spiderwort, green leaves of dock and yellow dandelion heads, even pieces of burnt wood tumble out and onto a silk scarf.
Such plants include maize (Zea mays), barley (Hordeum vulgare), tomato (Lycopersicon), mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), soybean (Glycine max), broad bean (Vicia faba), spiderwort (Tradescantia), onion (Allium cepa), Hawk's beard (Crepis capillaris), lily (Lilium), pea (Pisum sativum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).
91 (22) Spiderwort family (Commelinaeceae) Dayflower (Commelina diffusa) 0.
Farmers in the Southeast are facing a fast-spreading weed called tropical spiderwort, Commelina benghalensis (also known as "Benghal dayflower").
It is high on that short list of infernal, invasive ground covers that include ivy, spider plant, spiderwort, violets and periwinkle (Vinca major).
You may remember spiderwort from your grandparents' garden.
March Blooms April Blooms May Blooms Bluebonnets Indian Blanket Mexican hat Indian paintbrush Texas lantana Black-eyed Susan Winecups Rose mallow Standing cypress Blackfoot daisy Foxglove Pink evening primrose Drummond phlox Butterfly weed Giant spiderwort
Spiderwort (Tradescantia) or purple heart (Setcreasea purpurea) provides a tender trailing ground cover that thrives in full sun and reveals a true deep rich shade of natural purple.