spicule

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spicule

 [spik´ūl]
a sharp, needle-like body or spike.

spic·ule

(spik'yūl),
1. A small needle-shaped body.
2. Accessory reproductive structure in male nematodes; useful in identification of species.
[L. spiculum, dim. of spica, or spicum, a point]

spicule

/spic·ule/ (spik´ūl) a sharp, needle-like body.

spicule

(spĭk′yo͞ol) also

spicula

(-yə-lə)
n. pl. spic·ules also spic·ulae (-yə-lē)
A small needlelike structure or part, such as one of the silicate or calcium carbonate processes supporting the soft tissue of certain invertebrates, especially sponges.

spic′u·lar (-yə-lər), spic′u·late (-yə-lĭt, -lāt′) adj.

spicule

[spik′yo̅o̅l]
Etymology: L, spiculum, point
a small sharp body with a needlelike point.

spic·ule

(spik'yūl)
A small, needle-shaped body.
[L. spiculum, dim. of spica, or spicum, a point]

spicule

  1. a small spiked structure in male nematode worms that assists in copulation.
  2. a slender rod of calcium carbonate found in sponges, that supports the soft wall.

spicule

small spike at outer margin of the nail plate that can penetrate local nail wall (causing paronychia/ingrowing toenail) or cause local pain (i.e. a hang nail)

spic·ule

(spik'yūl)
A small, needle-shaped body.
[L. spiculum, dim. of spica, or spicum, a point]

spicule (spik´ūl),

n a small needle-shaped body.

spicule

1. a sharp, needle-like body or spike.
2. part of the male genital apparatus in nematodes; they engage the female genital orifice during copulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Vikram Butani, CEO of Kubtec, "3D specimen imaging is truly a game changer, as for the first time surgeons and radiologists will be able to clearly visualize the tumor and spiculations and not just the fiducials placed by the physician prior to the surgery based on the mammogram.
55) Lesional size, percentage of GGO, presence of alveolar collapse, coarse spiculation, air bronchograms, and thickening around bronchovascular bundles have been suggested to correlate with varying prognostic factors, including lymph node metastases, vascular invasion, or even simply prognosis.
2-6,8,9) As in the patient reported by Evans et al (4) and in all 12 cases in the series from Gunhan-Bilgen et al, (2) this particular tumor lacked spiculations, a feature that has been previously described for metaplastic carcinoma by Patterson et al (7) and others.
Known by names such as elastosis, sclerosing papillary proliferation, radial sclerosing lesion and sclerosing duct hyperplasia, the radial scar is one of few benign lesions that closely imitates breast carcinoma's ability to form spiculations (small, needle-shaped bodies).
Yet tumors are often shaped like three dimensional stars with long thin structures or spiculations extending from them and surgeons must remove every one of these in order to get a clean margin.