spheno-occipital

spheno-occipital

(sfē″nō-ŏk-sĭp′ĭ-tăl) [″ + L. occipitalis, occipital]
Concerning the sphenoid and occipital bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chordomas are malignant tumors originating from embryonic notochord remnants in the craniospinal axis, mostly the sacrococcygeal (50 percent) and the spheno-occipital regions (35 percent), though 15 percent can occur in the true vertebrae.
The spheno-occipital synchondrosis fuses prematurely in patients with Crouzon syndrome and midface hypoplasia compared with age-and gender-matched controls.
Virchow named the lesion "ecchordosis physaliphora," based on his theory that it was derived from the spheno-occipital synchondrosis.
It is expected, based on normal facial growth directions, that ACM would interrupt or halt normal growth by creating an increase in facial convexity and facial heights by interfering with the growth of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis in the forward and downward directional growth pattern (following Cohen 2006; Enlow and Hans 2008; Moyers and Enlow 1988; Proffett 2007).
The most common sites of chondrosarcoma origin are the petroclival, petro-occipital, spheno-occipital, and sphenopetrosal synchondroses.
Spheno-occipital syncondrosis in three-month-old children with clefts of the lip and palate: a radiographic study.
3,5] They originate from the sacrococcygeal region, the spheno-occipital region or the vertebrae, with 35%-40% located intracranially.
1,2) They usually originate from the bones of the skull base, at the sphenoethmoidal and spheno-occipital regions, but very rarely can also arise from other intracranial, extraosseous sites like the dura mater, the brain parenchyma or from within the ventricles.
Spheno-occipital chordomas may present with a nasal, paranasal, or nasopharyngeal mass.
The lesion extended distally to the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, anteriorly into the nasopharynx, and superiorly into the suprasellar cistern.
2) It accounts for 1-4% of all primary bone tumors (3) and mainly found in the sacrococcygeal and spheno-occipital regions.
They are divided into three broad categories: sacrococcygeal (60% of cases), spheno-occipital (25%), and vertebral (15%).