sperma


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sperma

(spĕr′mă) [Gr.]
1. Semen.
2. Spermatozoa.
References in periodicals archive ?
Somewhat surprisingly, the question that first occupies Aristotle regarding sperma is, Is sperma drawn from the whole body?
Returning to the progress of the discussion in GA, we can, in fact, make some sense of why Aristotle's discussion of the generative fluids should begin as it does, with what sounds like a subordinate and somewhat technical question about whether or not sperma derives from the body as a whole.
Next Aristotle examines the general nature of sperma and says, "Now the aim of sperma is to be, in its nature, the sort of stuff from which the things that take their rise in the realm of Nature are originally formed" (724a17).
Does the female discharge sperma as the male does, which would mean that the object formed is a single mixture produced from two spermations; or is there no discharge of sperma from the female?
The question reveals why Aristotle is concerned about the claim that the female discharges sperma as the male does.
Thus to his original question, Does the female discharge sperma as the male does?
35) Finally there are those, too, which do not arise from sperma and the union of the male and female archai.
Throughout this section, the author refers to menses as the 'fluid' (hygrotes or hygron), never as gone or sperma.