spend

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spend

noun A popular UK back-formation from the verb “spend”, defined as the amount of money spent on something.

Example
The Commercial Medicines Unit works collaboratively with both NHS pharmacists and suppliers in the collation and analysis of secondary care medicines spend on behalf of both the Department of Health and the NHS via its information systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xu (2005) recently linked family help and time spent on homework to students' attitudes toward homework and their use of homework management strategies.
She also notes that while the total number of earmarks in 2006 is lower than in 2005, the total dollar amount spent via earmarks has risen.
Ten school districts in Los Angeles County, including Los Angeles Unified, spent more than they took in during the last fiscal year, according to the Controller's Annual Financial Report of California K-12 Schools.
After conducting a thorough distribution of effort (DoE) evaluation, an analysis that establishes how personnel across the company actually spent their time, it was determined that the potential risks associated with cutting EHS expenses were too high.
Bob Dole stayed in the system and spent up to the maximum to beat Forbes.
This year, the official "budget document" is an upbeat, chatty volume that does not identify how much money will be spent for programs.
By analyzing your spent materials and researching a potential beneficial reuse site, you may avoid pitfalls that could turn disposal cost savings into cleanup nightmares.
If Robert Frank had his way, we would have spent a lot less over the last holiday season.
It should be obvious that scenario 2 costs the company far less -- in dollar outlays and cumulative time spent on the transaction.
5) Weaknesses identified in the study centered on the curriculum, expectations about the level of knowledge that should be acquired, the time spent by American students on schoolwork as compared with the time spent by children in other countries, and the relative attractiveness of the teaching profession.
The Fund grew, as offshore oil revenues continued to pour into the federal treasury, but those revenues were not spent.