spend

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Related to spendthrift: spendthrift trust, Spendthrift clause

spend

noun A popular UK back-formation from the verb “spend”, defined as the amount of money spent on something.

Example
The Commercial Medicines Unit works collaboratively with both NHS pharmacists and suppliers in the collation and analysis of secondary care medicines spend on behalf of both the Department of Health and the NHS via its information systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
USA], Aug 17 ( ANI ): Dear husbands, if your wives are spendthrift then you may have to communicate about finances, especially early in marriage to avoid financial and marriage conflicts, warns a study.
Over the past several years, various states have enacted legislation allowing for the creation of self-settled spendthrift trusts.
Jack inquired about the benefits of using a spendthrift trust and/or a discretionary trust.
A spendthrift provision is a provision in a trust agreement that states that the beneficiary cannot sell, pledge or encumber his beneficial interest, and that a creditor cannot attach a beneficiary's interest.
Trichet said that European nations need to restrict their spendthrift ways and urged nations to control debt to stimulate economic growth.
What's needed is a fiscally conservative majority in Washington, capable of and willing to check a spendthrift administration.
If the trust also contains provisions that prevent creditors from reaching trust assets, the trust is known as a "domestic asset protection trust" (DAPT), "asset protection trust" (APT), or a "self-settled spendthrift trust.
Spendthrift managers at Birmingham City Council launched the ironically titled BEST scheme to 'strengthen the psychological contract' with staff.
That is, on a scale with tightwad on one end and spendthrift on the other, people on one side tend to fall in love with people on the other.
To your intense spendthrift sun I bring/only a mister's hoarded match-flame.
Robert, Lord Rich, was a turncoat Royalist and a notorious spendthrift.
The primary causal factors of higher education's perceived spendthrift nature are: (1) The "Cost Disease of the Public Sector" (Baumol & Oates, 1976), which assures that higher education's costs must rise more rapidly than general societal costs; and (2)government-based "Shadow Economic Statistics," which make these cost increases look far greater than they actually are (Williams, 2006).