speed

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Related to speed of light: light year, E=mc2

speed

(spēd),
The magnitude of velocity without regard to direction. Compare: velocity.

speed

(spēd)
n.
Slang A stimulant drug, especially amphetamine or methamphetamine.
v. sped (spĕd) or speeded, speeding, speeds
v.intr.
Slang To be under the influence of a stimulant drug.

speed

Etymology: AS, spedan, to hasten
1 the rate of change of position with time. Compare velocity.
2 See amphetamines.
3 a reciprocal of the amount of radiation used to produce an image with various components of an x-ray imaging system, such as screens, film, and image intensifiers. There is often a tradeoff between radiation dose to the patient and the overall image quality. Thus a system using little radiation is "fast," whereas one requiring more radiation is "slow."
4 the amount of exposure of film to light or x-rays needed to produce a desired image. X-ray film speed usually is indicated as the reciprocal of the exposure in roentgens necessary to produce a density of 1 above the base and fog levels. See also fogged film fault.
Drug slang A regional street synonym for amphetamine, which may also refer to methamphetamine and crack cocaine
Vox populi Rapidity of movement

SPEED

Cardiology A clinical trial–Strategies for Patency Enhancement in the Emergency Department

speed

Drug slang A street synonym for amphetamine, which may also refer to methamphetamine and crack

speed

(spēd)
The magnitude of velocity without regard to direction.
Compare: velocity

speed

the change of distance with respect to time. A scalar quantity (i.e. having no directional component). linear speed is usually measured in metres per second (m.s-1), kilometres per hour (km.h-1) or miles per hour (mph), and angular speed in degrees per second (°.s-1) or radians per second (rad.s-1) See also velocity.

speed,

n the relative rapidity of action; rate of motion.
speed, film,
speed, high,
n a relatively great rapidity of motion. In cavity preparations, rotary instruments are classified according to the number of revolutions per minute (rpm) made by the cutting tool. Designation of each speed range presently varies. In general, conventional speed is 10,000 to 60,000 rpm, high speed is 60,000 to 100,000 rpm, and ultrahigh speed is more than 100,000 rpm. May also be used to describe an evacuation system.
speed of light,
n a speed of 186,300 miles/sec.
speed of radiation,
References in periodicals archive ?
The applied perspective--creating a compact, reliable and affordable as a price experimental apparatus based on the most modern electronics, allowing direct measurement of the speed of light.
Louth County Council spokesman Brian Harton claimed it was not possible to protect the Speed of Light from yobs.
That translates into a very small increase in the speed of light (assuming no change in the other constants that alpha depends on), but Lamoreaux's new analysis is so precise that he can rule out the possibility of zero change in the speed of light.
It turned out that the speed of light through any transparent medium is equal to the speed of light in a vacuum, divided by the index of refraction of the medium.
So, I find it difficult to reconcile propagation time calculations used in interferometer measurements which assume c, a well-known constant of nature, as the speed of light in vacuo, and the explicit solution for the variable v, the motion with respect to the ether, with light-speed anisotropy in any form.
The speed of light in a vacuum, usually denoted c, is a fundamental constant central to much of physics, particularly Einstein's theory of relativity.
Since the introduction of special relativity there has been much speculation as to whether or not it might be possible to travel faster than the speed of light, noting that there is no substantial evidence to suggest that this is presently feasible with any existing transportation mechanisms," said Professor Jim Hill, who developed the new formulas with Dr Barry Cox in the University's School of Mathematical Sciences.
In Gale's article there's a sidebar describing how to measure the speed of light in a microwave oven.
Dispute: The speed of light is always about 300,000 kilometers (186,000) miles per second.
Even though optical networks can offer transmission at wire speeds, when traversing tens or hundreds of miles, even at the speed of light (light traveling through a glass fiber moves at about two-thirds the speed of light in a vacuum), propagation delay and device turn-around-time become the new limiting factors.
The index, n, relates the speed that light travels in a vacuum to the speed of light in the material.
In his last years, Michelson, who had performed the fateful Michelson-Morley experiment (see 1887), grew interested in measuring the speed of light with new precision.