phone

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phone

(fōn) [Gr. phone, voice]
A single speech sound.

cell phone

, cellular phone
A portable telephone, used, for example, in ambulance-to-hospital communications and in 12-lead electrocardiogram transmission in some emergency medical systems. Although many people speculate that cellular phone use may increase the risk of brain cancers (e.g., gliomas or meningiomas), no correlation between moderate usage and cancer has been definitively identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phonological awareness of the speech sound structure of the language; b.
Researchers repeated the experiment with speech sounds that were altered to sound as if they had been processed by a 16- or 32-channel cochlear implant.
But, most importantly, effective prevention includes the direct teaching of speech sound awareness, alphabet knowledge, the links between sounds and symbols and fluent decoding of print (the ability to go from looking at printed words on a page to comprehension of meaning).
They found that the more years study participants spent playing instruments as youth, the faster their brains responded to a speech sound.
Users flip the pages on one side to one speech sound, and on the other to another sound, then compares them side by side.
I told him my cerebral palsy makes my speech sound slurred.
Written for a broad audience, this textbook walks through each stage of toddler language development, considers how each aspect of language affects all other aspects, and introduces the speech sound system studied by phonology.
The paper cites various studies that show what the newborn brain is capable of, such as the ability to distinguish the phonemes, or basic distinctive units of speech sound, and such attributes as pitch, rhythm and timbre.
Thus, it makes sense that texters rely on what they have available to them -- emoticons, deliberate misspellings that mimic speech sounds and, according to our data, punctuation.
ISLAMABAD -- Watching 3D images of tongue movements can help individuals learn speech sounds, a new study by University of Texas researchers indicated.
His conference speech sounds more hollow than ever.
Two years of music lessons improved the precision with which the children's brains distinguished similar speech sounds, a neural process that is linked to language and reading skills.

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