speckle


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Related to speckle: Speckle interferometry

speckle

(spĕk′əl)
n.
A speck or small spot, as a natural dot of color on skin, plumage, or foliage.

speck′le v.

speckle

A grainy distortion (a kind of “noise”) in an ultrasonographic image.
References in periodicals archive ?
This number is related (but not identical) to another number, characterizing the distortions--the number of speckles (bright spots) when attempt is made to focus the beam, e.
Intermountain Healthcare hopes to enroll more than 300 patients from its diabetes registry, one of the largest in the country, in the Speckle Tracking by Echo substudy.
Only LBO's patented holographic laser projection technology can simultaneously deliver a range of enabling features and benefits including high brightness, in-built laser speckle reduction, an ultra-wide throw angle, focus-free operation, low power consumption, and a robust design that naturally lends itself to miniaturisation and low cost manufacture.
The systems demonstrate the ultra-wide throw angle (greater than 90o) capabilities of LBO's patented holographic laser projection technology, and feature significant advances in speckle reduction.
Animal collection officer, Sue Seddon, removed several airgun pellets from his body before Speckle was transferred to Birch Veterinary Centre, Oxton, for further treatment.
Lawrence's group decided to look more closely at the speckles.
Traditionally, astronomers have eliminated some of this blurring in visible-light images by using speckle interferometry, which creates an image composed of many short exposures.
People thought of a speckle pattern as a random pattern," Feng says.
Their analysis demonstrated that laser speckle imaging (LSI) is capable of providing information correlated with plaque type, collagen content, lipid pool area, and fibrous cap thickness -- all thought to be important indicators of plaque vulnerability.
Its digital broadband beamformer with beam steering capabilities and powerful signal processing techniques, including Philips exclusive SonoCT real-time compound imaging with XRES technology, provide enhanced edges and margins for more sharply defined structures, reduced noise and speckle, and better visibility and contrast resolution of even the smallest structures.
The equipment was used in a technique called speckle interferometry, developed to help earth-bound astronomers compensate for the shimmering distortion of our atmosphere and employed primarily to distinguish between close-together "point sources' of light such as binary stars or Pluto and its moon Charon.