specimen


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specimen

 [spes´ĭ-men]
a small sample or part taken to show the nature of the whole, such as a small quantity of urine for urinalysis or a small fragment of tissue for microscopic study.
clean-catch specimen (clean-voided specimen) a urine specimen obtained after the external urethral area is washed with a liquid soap and rinsed well; then the patient starts a urinary stream, stops it, and voids into a sterile specimen container. The purpose of obtaining such a specimen is to minimize contamination by external organisms. Called also midstream specimen.
midstream specimen clean-catch specimen.
sputum specimen a sample of mucous secretion from the bronchi and lungs; see also sputum specimen.

spec·i·men

(spes'ĭ-mĕn), Avoid the misspelling speciman.
A small part, or sample, of any substance or material obtained for testing.
[L. fr. specio, to look at]

specimen

/spec·i·men/ (spes´ĭ-men) a small sample or part taken to show the nature of the whole, as a small quantity of urine for analysis, or a small fragment of tissue for microscopic study.

specimen

(spĕs′ə-mən)
n.
1. An individual, item, or part representative of a class or whole.
2. An organism, part of an organism, or fossil that has been collected and usually preserved, especially for display or scientific research.
3. A sample, as of tissue, blood, or urine, used for analysis and diagnosis.
4. Informal An individual; a person: a disagreeable specimen.

specimen

[spes′imən] pl. specimens
Etymology: L, specere, to look
a small sample of something intended to show the nature of the whole, such as a urine specimen.

specimen

A small sample of something–cells, organ, organism, plasma, tissue, whatever, that represents a whole, from which a diagnosis is rendered or other determination of said object's nature is made. See Fasting specimen, Fingerstick specimen, Frozen specimen, Rejected specimen.

spec·i·men

(spes'i-mĕn)
A small part or sample of any substance or material obtained for testing.
[L. fr. specio, to look at]

specimen

a whole or part of an organism used as an example or illustration.

specimen

sample of any substance/material obtained for testing/analysis

specimen

a small sample or part taken to show the nature of the whole, such as a small quantity of urine for urinalysis, or a small fragment of tissue for microscopic study.

specimen artifacts
changes in tissues or other samples for laboratory examination, caused by the collection, transport, fixing, section cutting, staining or other procedural manipulations.
forensic specimen
specimen collected in the knowledge that there will probably be litigation relating to the case. Requires complete, accurate identification of the specimen and the patient and client, and that a separate reserve specimen be kept for any further testing required by the court. All containers should be sealed so that they cannot be tampered with, and preferably in the presence of witnesses.
References in classic literature ?
At the risk of disappointing Richardson I stayed on, waiting for the Time Traveller; waiting for the second, perhaps still stranger story, and the specimens and photographs he would bring with him.
You will observe from the cartilage that this is no fossil specimen, but recent.
You'll say, upon my soul this is a tidy specimen of what my friends have to deal with; but this is nothing, sir
There the nets brought up beautiful specimens of fish: some with azure fins and tails like gold, the flesh of which is unrivalled; some nearly destitute of scales, but of exquisite flavour; others, with bony jaws, and yellow-tinged gills, as good as bonitos; all fish that would be of use to us.
He was to do this without the help of any written or printed specimens, with nothing in the shape of a grammar or analysis, but merely by oral communication with his Indian instructor, or with other natives, who, however comparatively intelligent, must from the nature of the case have been very imperfect teachers.
The Georgians held the album between them, and favored us with the few specimens of its contents which they considered ridiculous enough to be worth hearing.
The spars rigged up on the narrow hulls were indeed tall then, and the ship of which I think, with her coloured-glass skylight ends bearing the motto, "Let Glasgow Flourish," was certainly one of the most heavily-sparred specimens.
Whenever the boats landed at meal times, or for any temporary purpose, he would spring on shore, and set out on a hunt for new specimens.
He owned a voice as soothing as the wash of the sea, and stores of experiences as vast as the sea itself; for his business in life was to wander up and down the world, collecting orchids and wild beasts and ethnological specimens for German and American dealers.
There are, of course, hundreds and hundreds more, but these will do for specimens of the simpler rulings.
By day, one could admire the variety of its edifices, all sculptured in stone or wood, and already presenting complete specimens of the different domestic architectures of the Middle Ages, running back from the fifteenth to the eleventh century, from the casement which had begun to dethrone the arch, to the Roman semicircle, which had been supplanted by the ogive, and which still occupies, below it, the first story of that ancient house de la Tour Roland, at the corner of the Place upon the Seine, on the side of the street with the Tannerie.
Saintsbury's well-considered Specimens of English Prose Style, from Malory to Macaulay (Kegan Paul), a volume, as we think, which bears fresh witness to the truth of the old remark that it takes a scholar indeed to make a [4] good literary selection, has its motive sufficiently indicated in the very original "introductory essay," which might well stand, along with the best of these extracts from a hundred or more deceased masters of English, as itself a document or standard, in the matter of prose style.