species


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species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

/spe·cies/ (spe´shēz) a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety.
type species  the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.

species (Sp)

[spē′sēz, spē′shēz] pl. species (sp., spp.)
Etymology: L, form
the category of living things below genus in rank. A species is a genetically distinct group of demes that share a common gene pool and are reproductively isolated from all other such groups. See also deme, genus.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.

species

a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphological and physiological characteristics, the important one of which is that they are capable of interbreeding to produce fertile and viable offspring.

species difference
the difference between species in their response to therapeutic agents, poisons and infections due to physical, biochemical, immunological differences.
species specialist
a veterinarian who specializes in the diseases and management of an individual animal species.
type species
the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some new hybrid species arise with an increase in the number of chromosomes.
The result is an interpolation between known sampling locations informed by observed associations between the species and environmental characteristics.
Fisher hopes that by documenting all of the unique ant species in Madagascar, he can help to save the country's rapidly disappearing forests.
Even though bald eagles are making a strong return, some scientists aren't sure that these birds should be removed from the endangered species list anytime soon.
This fine monograph is not just a tour de force by the authors but also an honour to Canadian palaeontology itself: out of the 32 new species fully 23 are named for Canadian palaeontologists and geologists (including field assistants).
The three species include two high molecular weight species (H.
The bill would require the government to compensate property owners if steps to protect species thwart development plans.
Worrisome signs-like the mysterious disappearance of entire amphibian populations and fishers' nets that more frequently come up empty--reveal that there may be more species in trouble.
Nor do we understand many ecosystem services well enough to recreate them, not knowing what species are necessary for the services to work and in what proportions, or whether for some services there are essential or "keystone" species without which ecosystems would cease to function.
Many single-species examples exist around the world: eucalyptus species in South America and in Japan with imported wood, various pines (Pinus taeda in the United States, P.
15) Salmon "fertilize" freshwater life, both through decay of their carcasses and by providing a food source for other species.