spawn

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spawn

(spôn)
n.
1. The eggs of aquatic animals such as bivalve mollusks, fishes, and amphibians.
2. Offspring, especially when occurring in large numbers.
v. spawned, spawning, spawns
v.intr.
1. To deposit eggs; produce spawn.
2. To produce offspring in large numbers.
v.tr.
1. To produce or deposit (spawn).
2. To produce (offspring).

spawn′er n.

spawn

fish eggs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because Maumee Bay spawning sites are protected from severe storm events that can reduce egg and larval survival in rivers (Mion and others 1998) and on mid-lake reefs (Roseman and others 2001), reproductive success of walleye spawned in the bay may be higher resulting in a major contribution to the developing year-class in some years.
Close observations of the spawning activity in these tanks revealed that sexually compromised males actively participated in the spawning act, chasing females and competing with the healthy males for proximity to the females as they spawned.
The most advanced yolked, migratory nucleus, and hydrated oocytes that were destined to be spawned were identified for individuals on the basis of size-frequency distributions of whole oocytes (larger than 1000 microns).
Fish spawning periodicity was assessed from 2001 to 2003 by direct observation from an elevated deck, by sampling the net pen for freshly spawned eggs with a 500-[micro]m-mesh dip net, and by acoustically monitoring fish sounds.
This spring, a nationwide network of lightning detectors showed that storms over the central United States spawned positive flashes at three times their normal rate, Lyons and his colleagues report in the Oct.
Pacific Legal Foundation today hailed a ruling from a federal judge affirming that hatchery-spawned salmon are biologically indistinguishable from naturally spawned, so-called "wild" salmon, and reversing the action by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing the Oregon Coast coho salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.
Our broodstock yellowfin tuna have spawned over protracted time periods (nearly year-round on a daily basis) since October of 1996.
On both occasions several thousand mussels spawned profusely at low tide, leaving masses of gametes on their shells or concentrated in tidepools and surge channels.
Of the holdover-sized fish - those 16 to 18 inches and larger coveted by Crowley anglers - about 25 percent have been naturally spawned in Crowley tributaries and survived a couple of seasons in the lake.
Such sex-cycle manipulation might prove sufficient for controlling zebra mussels if the aquatic pests spawned just once a year, during a relatively brief period.