spatial relationships

spatial relationships

1 orientation in space; the ability to locate objects in the three-dimensional external world by using visual or tactile recognition and to make a spatial analysis of the observed information. Spatial orientation normally is a function of the right hemisphere of the brain.
2 the relative locations of staff and equipment in an operating room with particular emphasis on what is sterile, clean, or contaminated. The operating room nurse must maintain an awareness of the arrangement of people and the proximity of sterile to nonsterile areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
A GIS is the logical choice for a system to house the CO2 source and sink data, as it could visually display spatial relationships and perform queries and screening analyses with ease.
Without a doubt, GIS has great potential for any kinds of analysis focusing on discovering spatial relationships.
Mapping My Day" (who was mystified by maps until she figured out how to read them and make them, and it was a particularly difficult map that inspired her to become a spatial cognition geographer) and accomplished illustrator Laura Wood is a distinctively original picture book by the team of author Julie Dillemuth and introduces children ages 4 to 8 to spatial relationships and representation: where things and places are in relation to other things.
These kinds of tests are incredibly simple and involve people making judgements about visual spatial relationships.
Changes in some of these factors are linked with memory decline, thinking and language skills, and spatial relationships.

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