spatial disorientation


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spatial disorientation

In aerospace medicine, a term used to describe a variety of incidents occurring in flight, when the pilot fails to sense correctly the position, motion, or attitude of the aircraft or himself or herself within the coordinate system provided by the surface of the earth and gravitation.
See also: disorientation
References in periodicals archive ?
The researcher says that the first step is to understand the factors leading to spatial disorientation, which tends to occur in poor visibility conditions.
Aircrew Training Systems , a division of Environmental Tectonics Corporation (OTC Pink: ETCC) ("ETC" or the "Company"), announced today that it signed a contract with the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center ("AFLCMC") to provide up to four spatial disorientation flight simulators following a competitive bidding process.
Vertigo and spatial disorientation are two of the emergencies we brief before every flight.
Spatial disorientation in flight usually results from misperception of visual, vestibular, or proprioceptive cues.
We build our airplanes to be the absolute safest in the industry, with features like the cuffed wing to help prevent spins, electronic stability protection (ESP) to protect pilots from unusual flight attitudes, the "Blue Level button" to engage the autopilot while avoiding pilot spatial disorientation, and of course the parachute," says Dale Klapmeier, Co-founder and CEO of Cirrus Aircraft.
The use of night-vision devices (NVDs) restricts fields of view, diminishes depth perception and can cause spatial disorientation.
Spatial disorientation (SD) has been killing aircrew for decades.
The US inquiry, which concluded just months after the crash south of the Kuwaiti border on the first day of war in March 2003, reported that the US Marine Corps Sea Knight pilots suffered spatial disorientation.
The AAIB report added: 'The control loss may have resulted from spatial disorientation and mishandling of the controls but the possibility that aircraft malfunction contributed could not be eliminated
The photographs' laconic titles evoke an expert's shorthand evaluations of the black-box tapes from these accidents: Spatial Disorientation (pilot error, induced); Touchdown (premature); Wind Shear (unforeseeable) (all works 2000).
38pm, Kennedy may have experienced a problem known as spatial disorientation - where pilots cannot see the horizon and do not know in which direction they are flying.

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