spasmodic dysphonia


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Related to spasmodic dysphonia: Spasmodic torticollis

spasmodic dysphonia

a spasmodic contradiction of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx excited by attempted phonation, producing either adductor or abductor subtypes caused by a central nervous system disorder. A localized form of movement disorder.

spasmodic dysphonia

Etymology: Gk, spasmodes, spasms, dys, bad, phone, voice
a speech disorder in which phonation is intermittently blocked by larynx spasms. The cause can be organic. Also called spastic dysphonia.

spasmodic dysphonia

Laryngeal dystonia, spastic dysphonia Neurology A voice disorder characterized by spasmodic contraction of laryngeal muscles, which chokes off words as uttered, resulting in strained and strangled speech with breaks in rhythm; SD may be accompanied by other dystonias–eg,
blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, torticollis, writers' cramp Management Sectioning of recurrent laryngeal nerve may be complicated by late failure; botulinum toxin injection into laryngeal muscles may be preferred

spas·mod·ic dys·pho·ni·a

(spaz-mod'ik dis-fō'nē-ă)
A spasmodic contraction of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx excited by attempted phonation, producing either adductor or abductor subtypes caused by a central nervous system disorder. A localized form of movement disorder.
Synonym(s): spastic dysphonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spasmodic dysphonia is an idiopathic disorder of the larynx.
Andrew Blitzer, "Botulinum Toxin A and B: A Comparative Dosing Study for Spasmodic Dysphonia," Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery 133, no.
Botulinum toxin management of spasmodic dysphonia (laryngeal dystonia): a 12-year experience in more than 900 patients.
The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia and its modification by botulinum toxin.
In abductor spasmodic dysphonia, sudden involuntary muscle movements or spasms cause the vocal folds to open.
Some patients with spasmodic dysphonia may benefit from treatment by a speech-language pathologist.
In adductor and abductor spasmodic dysphonia conditions, the voice sounds normal while singing, shouting, laughing, and crying (NIH, 2010a).
Spasmodic dysphonia and botulinum toxin: Experience from the largest treatment series.
These two reported cases of dysphonia widen the spectrum of the different kinds of dystonias, which may be induced by SSRIs, such as dysphonia and especially spasmodic dysphonia.
Its one drawback is that, at present, several of the conditions that might be of particular interest to vocalists, for example, spasmodic dysphonia, are merely listed without any explanatory material.