sorbent


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sorbent

/sor·bent/ (sor´bent) an agent that sorbs; see absorbent and adsorbent.

sorbent

[sôr′bənt]
Etymology: L, sorbere, to swallow
1 n, an agent that attracts and retains substances by absorption or adsorption.
2 adj, the property of a substance that allows it to interact with another compound, usually to make it bind.

sorbent

an agent that sorbs.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 shows the effect of sorbent dosage on the % removal at equilibrium conditions.
This is probably related to shrinkage and compaction of the sorbent on drying giving narrower pores for the diffusion of the Cr(VI) ions [20].
The reactive sorbent powder does not interfere with operation of NBC detectors and monitors, such as the ACADA, M43A1 detector and ICAM
Although new sorbents and formats have gone a long way to making SPE more selective and easier to use, method development, throughput and simplification are still challenges.
Turchi says ADA's sorbent system has the benefits of being both robust and simple: no moving parts, and little training required.
While sorbent injection has been effective in reducing mercury emissions with some coal blends, current technologies have not achieved sufficient levels of reduction from blends of predominantly low-sulfur Western coal," said Skiles Boyd, director, environmental management and resources for DTE Energy.
In developing new products, SPC looks at the applications in which there is a critical need for sorbents and then fills that void.
Demand for another synthetic sorbent - meltblown polypropylene - will experience solid growth as well, especially in environmental cleanup operations.
Marie manufactures sorbent which can absorb 20 to 25 times its weight in oil.
The patented VIPER Mill is the only mill developed specifically for dry sorbent injection and delivers the smallest particle size, highest throughput and greatest cost savings in the industry.