sonorant

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Related to sonorants: obstruents

sonorant

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Weak stops occurred (a) after a stressed syllable at the beginning of a closed syllable between two vowels or a sonorant and a vowel (radical gradation), and (b) after an unstressed syllable intervocalically (suffixal gradation).
Since the sequences in question always cross a syllable boundary, and since an obvious difference between stops and fricatives is the difference in sonority, we may look to the Syllable Contact Law (Murray and Vennemann 1983; Vennemann 1988), which requires an onset consonant to be less sonorant than a preceding coda consonant, to provide an answer.
The most accurate description of this difference runs as follows: "Overall, the rhythmical character of the first version is marked by the emphasis on and pauses after 'shun' and 'heaven,' whereas the relative lack of pausing and the holding of the reverberations of final consonants so that they flow into the next word makes the second version more even and sonorant.
It must be noted that, thanks to the articulatory diversity of "basal" sonorants, phonetic realisations of /r/ will often vary allophonically and dialectally as well as idiolectally.
Apart from the intervocalic position, different types of plosives are opposed in Ingrian in consonant clusters starting with a sonorant (in all other contexts the opposition is neutralized).
19) Proximity-constrainted nasal harmony in Ndonga (same for Kikongo): sonorants in adjacent syllables are compelled by CORR-N-[?
90 data from Imdlawn Tashlhiyt Berber are introduced with syllabic sonorants but in a footnote he makes reference to a talk held in 1995 by P.
2002 "Palatalisation of sonorants in Older Scots", in: Jacek Fisiak (ed.
The markedness constraint *CodaObs refers to coda obstruents to capture the fact that in Dominican different coda consonants behave differently: thus while obstruents tend to be deleted, sonorants are faithfully retained (or vocalized in some dialects [Pineros 2003]).
The connection of the sonorants [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with the vowel [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is a common phenomenon in various Semitic languages.
In brief, sonorants are devoiced before some plosives, although all of the plosives themselves are obviously voiceless.
Most distinctive among these are the alternations of sonorants and quasi-obstruent v which are involved in a whole circuit of mutual substitutions: