sonorant


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Related to sonorant: obstruent

sonorant

See voiced.
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Rather, a language-specific morphological alignment constraint tX-TO-CORSON is necessary, requiring a t-initial lenition allomorph to follow a coronal sonorant.
The relevant phonemes: vowels, sonorants, h, and voiced fricatives, have a common feature of performance: continuity.
Halle and Keyser have formulated the phonetic conditions in which two syllables can be allocated to one metrical position, among them: when there are two consecutive vowels with no intervening consonant; or the two are separated by a sonorant or by a voiced fricative; sometimes two (unstressed) function words can be allocated to one position.
41-42), but can occur as the syllable onset if a sonorant (vowel or resonant) follows.
A single short movement may not be sonorant enough to be properly perceived by the interlocutor; a reduplicated base, however, will be.
It is formed by prefixing a vowel (/[dpsilon]/) to the verbal root, possibly together with a consonant -- if the root begins with a single consonant, or a consonantal cluster -- if the root begins with such, unless one of the consonants is a sonorant.
Weak stops occurred (a) after a stressed syllable at the beginning of a closed syllable between two vowels or a sonorant and a vowel (radical gradation), and (b) after an unstressed syllable intervocalically (suffixal gradation).
Introduction of a prothetic vowel *e- before word-initial clusters of obstruent + sonorant, e.
In Ndonga, the ranking is the opposite, and sonorant pairs in nonadjacent syllables do not correspond (20b):
Apart from the intervocalic position, different types of plosives are opposed in Ingrian in consonant clusters starting with a sonorant (in all other contexts the opposition is neutralized).
Regarding the third argument, it should first be remembered that the forms bar and tren can be easily explained as another example of the sporadic interchange of sonorant consonants between Aramaic and other languages, as well as between different dialects of Aramaic.
They may also show differences from their less emphatic pronunciation, which may be less easy to envision as hyperarticulations: n, for example, shows strength in some languages by become less nasal and more like d or t, and in others by becoming more like a vowel, meaning louder and more sonorant.