somnambulism

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Related to somnambulistic: somnambulism

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
28) Irshaad Osman Ebrahim, Somnambulistic Sexual Behavior (Sexsomnia), 13:4 J.
sanofiaventis, (11) at least 500 plaintiffs claim zolpidem is related to sleep-driving, sleep-eating, and other somnambulistic behaviors.
The larger part of the narrative, which thus charts Henry's spiritual education, takes place while he believes that his beloved is dead, or dying, or living precariously on the borders of life and death; and indeed, Winifred, in her somnambulistic unconsciousness, has the kind of death-in-life typical of the Romantic Image.
He argues that euphemistic articulation--"innocent somnambulistic insulation"--renders prisons "clean" and "hygienic," and denies human suffering, misery, damage, and harm.
If you manage to stay awake during this somnambulistic stroll through the nature of life and love, you'll be left with questions such as: Just what was the point?
We still need to determine whether there is a continuing danger to society of violent somnambulistic behaviors.
It became increasingly apparent in the late 1950s and early 1960s--even to the most somnambulistic white citizens--that radical social change was a charge taken to heart by nearly every black American under the age of 40.
Eleanor, the current Mrs Wood, can hardly sleep herself for fear that their home in Fife will be razed to the ground by the somnambulistic culinary efforts.
For anyone who has been politically active during the long dark era of the past two decades, the events in Seattle were a Rip van Winkle-like experience of awaking from a long somnambulistic slumber.
It valued the dark, the impure, the uncontrolled, the landscape, the incongruous, the somnambulistic, the sentimental, the foreboding, the passionate" (166).
My wife Maria used to be prone to somnambulistic walkabouts and, many years ago, climbed out of our bed, walked down the corridor and slipped under the duvet with our close friend Barry who, being a gentleman, did not want to wake her up and cause her embarrassment.
Throughout the story she inhabits a psychological territory of shifting borders among fantasy, dream, and reality, a somnambulistic, hallucinatory state that involves a loss of self and will, a casting away of identity, and, finally, the appropriation of a new self that includes the shadowy figure of "Jim," a man she first encounters on the bus who reappears and disappears throughout the story.