somnambulism

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Related to somnambulistic: somnambulism

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, in an eerily somnambulistic moment, the audience (as in Reflective theatre) indirectly bears witness to the torching of the family house by vigilantes in the unidentified homeland when a childlike drawing of a house is set on fire.
The movements, variously sinuous, lively, somnambulistic, gymnastic and yogic, echoed that idea.
The condition of stupidity as an 'ethical destination'--an uncanny form of awareness that 'undoes knowledge', recognizes an inviolable alterity and shuns metaphysical or idealistic abstractions in order to focus on the miraculous power of sentience and on the 'question of other lives' besides our own--is what Sam Durrant perceptively speaks about in one of his recent essays (3), underlining the paradoxically somnambulistic quality of this awakening, which overwhelms any dissenter who chooses to reject the imperialistic "ethos" and listen to the inward voice of conscience.
Bobbing is easy to start but difficult to stop both for me and the Mister who hates bobbing almost as much as he hates me pretending to be somnambulistic and/or blind.
These twenty-five minutes of somnambulistic life under the threat of death do not disturb me as a blackout but as an hallucination.
Bill expressed a strong desire to be hypnotized by Howard, and when Howard tried it, he found that Bill could be placed almost instantly into an apparently deep, somnambulistic trance.
The sword-swallower recently learned how to put himself into a somnambulistic trance needed to help him swallow multiple swords in the Circus of Horrors, visiting the Empire next month.
The sword swallower and hypnotist, aka Helmut Kichmeier, had just learned the art of hypnotism to help put himself into somnambulistic trance and auto suggestion to allow him to swallow multiple swords in the infamous Circus Of Horrors.
The American-Swiss artist duo Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler is internationally renowned for video and photographic works characterised by enigmatic plot lines and imagery which exert a somnambulistic pull.
Therefore, the tormented spirit that glared out of bodily eyes, when what seemed Ahab rushed from his room, was for the time but a vacated thing, a formless somnambulistic being, a ray of living light, to be sure, but without an object to color, and therefore a blankness in itself
Our somnambulistic lives are routinely interrupted by the thoughts of conspiracy theorists.
Yet here was another retail operation, opened with high hopes and great expectations that It would shake up the somnambulistic furniture business.