somatostatin


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Related to somatostatin: Octreotide

somatostatin

 (SRIF, SS) [so″mah-to-stat´in]
a cyclic tetradecapeptide hormone and neurotransmitter that inhibits the release of peptide hormones in many tissues. It is released by the hypothalamus to inhibit the release of growth hormone (GH, somatotropin) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) from the anterior pituitary; it is also released by the delta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas to inhibit the release of glucagon and insulin and by the similar D cells in the gastrointestinal tract.

so·ma·to·stat·in

(sō'mă-tō-stat'in), [MIM*182450]
A tetradecapeptide capable of inhibiting the release of somatotropin by the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland; somatostatin has a short half-life; it also inhibits the release of insulin, glucagon, and gastrin. Used in the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism, and pancreatic tumors.
[somatotropin + G. stasis, a standing still, + -in]

somatostatin

/so·ma·to·stat·in/ (SS) (-stat´in) a polypeptide elaborated primarily by the median eminence of the hypothalamus and by the delta cells of the islets of Langerhans; it inhibits release of thyrotropin, somatotropin, and corticotropin by the adenohypophysis, of insulin and glucagon by the pancreas, of gastrin by the gastric mucosa, of secretin by the intestinal mucosa, and of renin by the kidney.

somatostatin

(sō-măt′ə-stăt′n, sō′mə-tə-)
n.
A polypeptide hormone produced chiefly by the hypothalamus that inhibits the secretion of various other hormones, such as somatotropin, glucagon, insulin, thyrotropin, and gastrin.

somatostatin

[sō′matōstat′in]
a hormone produced in the hypothalamus that inhibits the release of somatotropin (growth hormone) from the anterior pituitary gland. It also is produced in other parts of the body and inhibits the release of certain other hormones, including thyrotropin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucagon, insulin, and cholecystokinin, and of some enzymes, including pepsin, renin, secretin, and gastrin. Also called growth hormone release inhibiting hormone.

so·ma·to·stat·in

(sō'mă-tō-stat'in)
A tetradecapeptide capable of inhibiting release of somatotropin, insulin, and gastrin.
Compare: bioregulator
Synonym(s): growth hormone-inhibiting hormone, somatotropin release-inhibiting hormone.
[somato- + G. stasis, a standing still, + -in]

somatostatin

a hormone of the hypothalamus that inhibits the release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland.

somatostatin

hormone secreted at several sites, with widespread inhibitory effects on other secretions: from the hypothalamus, as growth hormone-inhibiting hormone (GH-IH) acting in the anterior pituitary; in the pancreas, inhibits other pancreatic secretions; from the intestinal wall, inhibits many hormonal and enzyme secretions in the gut.

so·ma·to·stat·in

(sō'mă-tō-stat'in) [MIM*182450]
Tetradecapeptide capable of inhibiting release of somatotropin by anterior lobe of pituitary gland.
[somatotropin + G. stasis, a standing still, + -in]

somatostatin

a cyclic tetradecapeptide hormone and neurotransmitter that inhibits the release of peptide hormones in many tissues. It is released by the hypothalamus to inhibit the release of growth hormone (GH, somatotropin) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the anterior pituitary; it is also released by the delta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas to inhibit the release of glucagon and insulin and by the similar D cells in the gastrointestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following were the results (mean [+ or -] SEM) obtained after somatostatin therapy in S.
Balance between somatostatin and D2 receptor expression drives TSH-secreting adenoma response to somatostatin analogues and dopastatins.
In November 2014, the 99mTcTektreotide whole body scintigraphy revealed two lesions (27 mm and 17 mm) with expression of somatostatin receptors on the pancreatic body topography.
Findings from a study of nine patients with acromegaly suggest that adding a dopamine agonist can be an inexpensive and noninvasive way to help patients whose disease is not adequately controlled by somatostatin therapy alone, said Dr.
1] Additionally, immunohistochemical reactivity for a wide array of endocrine products has been variously described in GPs,[1] for example, pancreatic polypeptide, calcitonin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, gastrin, leu-enkephalin, met-enkephalin, serotonin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide.
Because all of these disorders are characterized by expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes.
1999) Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess two somatostatin mRNAs that are differentially expressed.
New therapy guidelines include combinations of medications, including the combined use of somatostatin analogs and a growth hormone receptor agonist.
The company added that the Lutathera medication effective for somatostatin receptor-positive gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs).
Contract notice: Medicinal products containing somatostatin analogue.
com)-- Braasch Biotech LLC, a biopharmaceutical company pioneering a new field of anti-somatostatin vaccines, today announced the company has been notified by China's State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO) concerning the office's approval of a patent application, Compositions and Methods for Enhanced Somatostatin Immunogenicity.
Topics include the role pituitary tropic status has in tumor development, the estrous cycle as an instigator of anterior pituitary cell renewal, bone morphogenetic Protein-4 control of pituitary pathophysiology, and an animal model of prolactinoma, estrogen-treated animals to use in studies, the question of whether dopamine agonist treatment should be life-long, pituitary differentiation and regulation and the implications in hormone research, the regulation of growth hormone sensitivity by sex steroid, gene therapy in the neuroendocrine system, expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes and treatment outcomes, and new aspects in the diagnosis and treatment of Cushing Disease.

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