somatopause

so·ma·to·pause

(sō'mă-tō-pawz'),
Decrease in growth hormone-insulinlike growth factor axis activities associated with aging.

so·ma·to·pause

(sō'mă-tō-pawz)
Decrease in growth hormone-insulinlike growth factor axis activities associated with aging.

somatopause

(sō-mă′tō-pawz) [Gr. soma, body, + pausis, cessation]
The age-related decline in the secretion of growth hormone, typically noticeable after age 60. Treatments may include formal exercise programs or, in some instances, growth hormone replacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decrease in the secretory activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis, commonly referred to as somatopause, correlates with a number of undesirable symptoms generally associated with aging.
Some of the most compelling evidence that somatopause may respond favorably to synthetic GH replacement therapy comes from investigations involving patients suffering from total or near total absence of GH secretion as a result of pituitary disease.
However, following a landmark study by Rudman and colleagues in 1990, which provided the first evidence that GH supplementation in the elderly could diminish--and potentially reverse--some of the physical symptoms associated with somatopause, (25) exogenous GH therapy has been controversial (10,26-37) and associated with high costs.