somatic

(redirected from somatically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

somatic

 [so-mat´ik]
pertaining to or characteristic of the body (soma).

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik),
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general. Synonym(s): parietal (2)
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation. Synonym(s): parietal (3)
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

somatic

/so·mat·ic/ (so-mat´ik)
1. pertaining to or characteristic of the soma or body.
2. pertaining to the body wall in contrast to the viscera.

somatic

(sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affecting the body, especially as distinguished from a body part, the mind, or the environment; corporeal or physical.
2. Of or relating to the wall of the body cavity, especially as distinguished from the head, limbs, or viscera.
3. Of or relating to the portion of the vertebrate nervous system that regulates voluntary movement.
4. Of or relating to a somatic cell or the somatoplasm.

so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

somatic

somatic

adjective Pertaining to
1. The body.
2. Not the viscera.

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general.
Synonym(s): parietal (2) .
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation.
Synonym(s): parietal (3) .
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

somatic

1. Pertaining to the body (soma), as opposed to the mind (psyche).
2. Pertaining to general body cells that divide by MITOSIS, as distinct from ova and spermatozoa that are formed by MEIOSIS. All the body cells except those in the ovaries and testes that produce ova and spermatozoa.
3. Relating to the outer walls or framework of the body.

somatic

  1. of or relating to the SOMA.
  2. of or relating to the human body as distinct from the mind.

somatic

adj from soma n , derived from the Greek for 'body'; used to refer to (1) the body as distinct from the mind (e.g. as in 'psychosomatic', ascribing physical symptoms to mental causes); (2) the substance of the body, excluding the internal organs, i.e. as distinct from visceral. Hence somatic nerves, the components of the peripheral nervous system both sensory and motor, that serve the skin and musculoskeletal structures.

somatic

musculoskeletal parts of the body (in contrast to the visceral parts)

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to soma or trunk, wall of the body cavity, or body in general.
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal muscle and innervation of the latter.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

somatic (sōmat´ik),

n derived from
soma, meaning the body, as distinguished from the mind. Pertains to the framework of the body as distinguished from the viscera; hence the term
somatic nerves describes the nerves associated with the musculoskeletal function of the muscles of the body.

somatic

1. pertaining to or characteristic of the body or soma.
2. pertaining to the body wall, not the viscera.

somatic afferent system
the system of sensory neurons scattered around the body and responding to pain, touch, temperature and other external stimuli.
somatic cell
see somatic cell.
somatic cell count (SCC)
measurement of somatic cells in milk. An indication of mastitis. See also linear score.
somatic cell hybridization
fusion in the laboratory of two different populations of somatic cells.
somatic mutation
see somatic mutation.
somatic myoneural junction
somatic nerves
nerves supplying the body wall and limbs.
somatic pain
pain emanating from muscles, skeleton, skin; pain in the parts of the body other than the viscera.
somatic sensation
central perceptions of sensory stimuli from the body wall and limbs include touch, temperature, tickle, itch, pain, conscious proprioception.
somatic theory
this postulates that very few immunoglobulins are inherited but there is great diversification in differentiating somatic cells.

Patient discussion about somatic

Q. Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? If not what else may be the factor? If it did not seem to be that you were actually losing your vision and that you needed glasses.

A. Depression may be part of a wider problem. Perhps stress headaches or migraine headaches or something like that is causing the vision problem. Tension will cause your muscles to lock up. Some of the tension headaches I have had made me think I was not seeing so good. It was like a pain all the way around and across the top of my nead. My doctor readily recognized that symptom and gave me a presscription for them, and it has worked well on them, something called Dolgic.

More discussions about somatic
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, language can help the poet regain subjective unity by allowing its semiotic origin in the (female) body to play a role in constructing mystical meaning, in striving for subjective self-unity through an imago that is somatically conceived, though symbolically represented, in language.
For example, understanding that distress may be expressed somatically among some such individuals would enable the healthcare professional to understand the cultural function of the complaints, rather than pathologize them as somatization.
For many adolescents this gender role discrepancy is manifested somatically as BID (Thompson et al.
So within the group of somatically ill, it's worth screening for psychiatric disorders to help them.
LOH studies are useful in identifying new tumor-suppressor genes based on the model that one inherited allele is mutated and the other is lost somatically, which is often the case in cancer tissue.
With the continuing development of new reproductive and sexual technologies, slowly altering the course and appearance of postmodern society, gender dystopia is increasingly interrogated, theoretically and somatically, as science fiction becomes science.
Two implications follow: first, what Damasio calls the "somatic marking" of mental images (making involuntary emotional responses inseparable from ethically disturbing cognitions) is crucial to practical reasoning (humanism's phronesis, prudentia); second, humans normally respond somatically to images of afflicted others in ways that support Levinas's claim that ethics is not "added on" to subjective experience, but rather is its defining context.
8) These bodies exhibit a "litany of non-brain-mediated somatically integrative functions," including
Kept on rigid play, sleep, and feeding schedules as infants, the children learned somatically from early on that time is a taskmaster who brooks no deviation from the one "correct" sequence.
Nervios may be expressed somatically as headaches, dizziness, and difficulty sleeping, (35) or as emotional problems such as loneliness, isolation, nostalgia, and boredom.
5: female readers are portrayed as able to respond to a narrative only somatically, and as borrowing the parameters of their aesthetic judgments from logocentric notions such as "unity and orderly development" (118).
If horses connect precolonialism and postcolonialism, as well as materiality and spirituality in this context, generally, as this representation suggests, they express themselves somatically through movement.