somatic pain


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Related to somatic pain: Neuropathic pain

somatic pain

generally well-localized pain that results from the activation of peripheral nociceptors without injury to the peripheral nerve or central nervous system.

somatic pain

Neurology Pain arising in nerve endings of muscles, skin, bones; it is highly localizable–the "trademark" indicator of SP is the ability to localize it with “pin point" or fingerpoint precision; Pts describe SP as aching, gnawing Examples Bone Fx, wounds, large bruises, bone metastases. See Pain, Pain management.

so·mat·ic pain

(sō-mat'ik pān)
Unpleasant sensation originating in the skin, ligaments, muscles, bones, or joints.

somatic pain

pain affecting trunk region

somatic

1. pertaining to or characteristic of the body or soma.
2. pertaining to the body wall, not the viscera.

somatic afferent system
the system of sensory neurons scattered around the body and responding to pain, touch, temperature and other external stimuli.
somatic cell
see somatic cell.
somatic cell count (SCC)
measurement of somatic cells in milk. An indication of mastitis. See also linear score.
somatic cell hybridization
fusion in the laboratory of two different populations of somatic cells.
somatic mutation
see somatic mutation.
somatic myoneural junction
somatic nerves
nerves supplying the body wall and limbs.
somatic pain
pain emanating from muscles, skeleton, skin; pain in the parts of the body other than the viscera.
somatic sensation
central perceptions of sensory stimuli from the body wall and limbs include touch, temperature, tickle, itch, pain, conscious proprioception.
somatic theory
this postulates that very few immunoglobulins are inherited but there is great diversification in differentiating somatic cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, they "needed" to learn how to participate in daily life activities, especially on days when they felt depressed and/or experienced somatic pain.
Making an accurate diagnosis of visceral or somatic pain in the disabled can be a challenge in itself - depending on the neurological lesion site, localisation of the pain is poor and the usual signs and symptoms may be difficult to elicit.
Neuropathic pain is distinguished from somatic pain by the fact that: