solitary play

solitary play

a form of play among a group of children within the same room or area in which each child engages in an independent activity using toys that are different from the toys of the others, concentrating solely on the particular activity, and showing no interest in joining in or interfering with the play of others. Compare cooperative play. See also associative play, parallel play.
References in classic literature ?
Overhead was a gray expanse of cloud, slightly stirred, however, by a breeze; so that a gleam of flickering sunshine might now and then be seen at its solitary play along the path.
Here the story shifts dramatically to the boy's solitary play.
We propose that the results cohere if we introduce a distinction between those metacommunicative behaviours which can occur in solitary play and those which are exclusive to social pretend play contexts; that is, they are always communicated directly to a play partner(s).
Elisabetta Palagi and Giada Cordoni from the University of Pisa, Italy, found that chimpanzee solitary play peaks in infancy, while the time spent in social play was relatively constant between infants and juveniles.
Design and layout of the garden allows solitary play or within a small group requiring little adult intervention.
Christensen says, "If you will be moving an outside cat indoors, keep in mind that you will need to provide ample opportunities for scheduled, interactive and solitary play, puzzle-solving, food-searching, cat videos, etc.
Once children emerge from their inclination to engage almost exclusively in solitary play, they begin a gradual and piecemeal journey toward peer play that tends to follow a fairly predictable pattern.
Solitary play encourages creativity, reflection, and problem-solving and alleviates boredom; group play promotes social roles and helps kids develop cooperation skills and verbal and body language.
The play behaviors of children who are visually impaired have been found to be predominantly exploratory, with more time spent in solitary play (or interacting with adults) than those of sighted children (Skellenger & Hill, 1994; Troster & Brambring, 1993, 1994).
The purpose of this study was to identify potential collateral changes in solitary play following the acquisition of cooperative play in three children with autism.
Parten's social play categories involve Solitary play, Parallel play, Associative play, and Cooperative play.
Solitary play versus social play and delay of gratification were not significantly related (p = .