solanine


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solanine

(sō′lə-nēn′, -nĭn) also

solanin

(-nĭn)
n.
A bitter poisonous alkaloid, C45H73NO15, found in potatoes and other plants of the nightshade family. It has narcotic properties and was formerly used to treat epilepsy.

solanine

[sō′lə·nēn]
a steroidal alkaloid found in several species of Solanum, such as the nightshades and the green spots on potatoes. It causes hemolysis, central nervous system depression, and often fatal respiratory failure.

sol·a·nine

(sō'lă-nēn)
A toxic alkaloid found in parts of solanaceous plants, including potato skins; plant diseases (e.g., potato blight) may raise the concentration to a harmful level.

solanine

a toxic glycoalkaloid in plants of solanum. Solanine is metabolized to the sugar solanose.

solanine group
the plants in Solanum spp. which contain solanine. Includes, e.g. S. dulcamara, S. nigrum, S. tuberosum, S. lycopersicum, S. melongena and S. pseudocapsicum.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, however, Webb (1973:295) argues that an important food staple of inland Australia was provided by ripe fruits of wild gooseberries, of which the immature fruits are generally poisonous, containing alkaloids such as solanine so 'that botany had to begin anew for Aborigines in sclerophyll Australia'.
Solanine can't be destroyed by baking, frying or microwaving.
In fact, potato breeders check potatoes to make sure they don't contain too much solanine; those with more than 20 milligrams of solanine per 100 grams are considered unfit to eat.
Potatoes, tomatoes, and solanine toxicity (Solanum tuberosum L.
The plants of this genus mainly contain steroidal alkaloids like solamargine, solasonine and solanine and steroidal sapogenins, diosgenin and diosgenone.
TAKE CARE: Potatoes which have gone green contain SOLANINE and CHACONINE which are poisonous and can cause migraine and drowsiness.
This green contains a toxic compound called solanine and should not be eaten.
Unlike a potato's most common glycoalkaloids -- solanine and choconine -- this one is acetylated (contains an extra CH.
If potatoes grow shoots or begin to go green, this indicates the presence of a potentially toxic chemical called solanine, so you should make sure you chop them off.
Fructose, glucose and galactose were detected in the fruits (Leekning and Rocca, 1968), and solanine was isolated from its roots and stems (Siqueira and Macan, 1976).
However, if they grow shoots or go green, this indicates the presence of a chemical called solanine which could make you ill, so chop off green bits and shoots before cooking.
POTATOES: They last for months in a cool place but if they grow shoots this indicates the presence of a chemical called solanine, which could make you ill, so chop green bits off before cooking.