erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

erosion

wearing away, by friction or pressure

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion (ērō´zhən),

n the chemical or mechanicochemical destruction of tooth substance, the mechanism of which is incompletely known, which leads to the creation of concavities of many shapes at the cementoenamel junction of teeth. The surface of the cavity, unlike dental caries, is hard and smooth.
Enlarge picture
Erosion.

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Department of Interior did not want to lose control over the soil erosion program (even though funding for the program was slated to end in another year), and many congressional leaders did not want to create yet another government program that would cost money.
Deforestation and pasture degradation is one of the main root causes of soil erosion (both by water and wind) leading to removal of top soil and desertification.
Someone building a new home or digging a pond, for instance, will probably need a soil erosion permit.
Soil erosion in the control treatment was greatest for the loam (950.
of California-Los Angeles) examines soil erosion in the Georgia Piedmont over the entire course of European settlement.
As its title "Westward Hoe" implies, chapter six examines the association between soil erosion and the spread of European agriculture in North America.
To assess soil erosion during the Mayan era, Anselmetti's team measured how much clay had washed into Guatemala's Lake Salpeten.
This aims to help farmers improve water quality and tackle diffuse pollution caused by soil erosion and the use of fertilisers and agrichemicals.
And that means less air and water pollution, less greenhouse gases, and less soil erosion.
The "feedstock" would be the indigenous jatropha plant, an oil-bearing hedge frequently used in Africa as a windbreak to prevent soil erosion.