soft drink


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A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

soft drink

A nonalcoholic beverage, typically carbonated and sweetened.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on products type, the global carbonated soft drinks market can be classified into the following segments:
Adeeb Rizvi said the people should avoid soft drinks at Iftar times as it causes kidney problems.
Asahi Group was founded in July 2011 as a holding company owning not only Asahi Soft Drinks but also Asahi Breweries Ltd.
6 percent of those with COPD reported consuming more than half a litre of soft drink per day.
The American Beverage Association says that diet soft drinks have grown from 25.
The proposal before the ABA comes nearly one year after Canada's beverage industry instituted a ban on carbonated soft drinks in elementary and middle schools.
Healthy diets and the consumption of soft drinks should be addressed by children, families, and educators.
Ortiz's original soda bill would have levied a 2-cent tax on soft drinks in order to raise $342 million a year for schools that agreed to stop selling soda on campus and to pay for nutritional and student physical education programs.
If you do have a soft drink, make sure to brush your teeth afterward.
The average Venezuelan guzzles an amazing 280 eight-ounce bottles of soft drinks per year, which translates into estimated sales in excess of US$1 billion.
Our results suggest a potential association between daily diet soft drink consumption and vascular outcomes.
The output of green tea soft drinks totaled 1,421,000 kiloliters in Japan last year, riding a wave of popularity among weight-conscious women in their teens and early 20s and pushing oolong tea drinks, long dominant in the market for tea-based soft drinks, out of the top spot.