soft drink


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A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

soft drink

A nonalcoholic beverage, typically carbonated and sweetened.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understand the key motivators driving demand for adult soft drinks.
Sugar is known to be bad for the teeth, but sugar-free soft drinks present dangers, as well.
Adeeb Rizvi said the people should avoid soft drinks at Iftar times as it causes kidney problems.
Asahi Group was founded in July 2011 as a holding company owning not only Asahi Soft Drinks but also Asahi Breweries Ltd.
6 percent of those with COPD reported consuming more than half a litre of soft drink per day.
The American Beverage Association says that diet soft drinks have grown from 25.
The proposal before the ABA comes nearly one year after Canada's beverage industry instituted a ban on carbonated soft drinks in elementary and middle schools.
Mr Pearson said, 'I think it's a very good idea, because people have been complaining for years and years about being taken by surprise by the price of soft drinks, which have always seemed so expensive compared to beers, shorts and wines.
We have evidence that drinking sweetened soft drinks will lead to an increased risk of obesity.
While acknowledging good performance in soft drinks, Brandt says he is unimpressed by FEMSA's beer story.
Banning soft drinks in schools will do absolutely nothing to help the obesity problem,'' said Sean McBride, spokesman for the National Soft Drinks Association.