soft corns

soft corns

heloma molle; see heloma molle, corn, Table 1
Table 1: Types and presentations of corn (clavus)
Corn typeName (abbreviation)Typical siteLesion characteristics
HardHeloma durum (HD)Over bony prominences and jointsDark yellow; hard central nucleus, overlain by callosity
SoftHeloma molle (HM)At base of interdigital webspace/interdigital aspect of digit, overlying an interpahalangeal jointWhite/yellow macerated hyperkeratosis; shallow, rubbery nucleus
SeedHeloma miliare (HMill)Weight-bearing skin
Areas of dry skin
Isolated or groups of tiny hyperkeratotic lesions with very hard nuclei
FibrousAreas of skin under high load
Long-standing lesions
Long-term fibrosis ties lesion to underlying tissues; difficult to resolve fully
NeurovascularHeloma neurovasculare (HNV)Areas subject to high load and torsionAs HD, plus elements of vascular/nerve tissue within the nucleus; enucleation is usually painful
Durlacher'sLateral nail sulcus of varus fifth and fourth toesLocally painful; can be overlooked as they resemble nail tissue
SubungualSubungual heloma (HSub-ung)Nail bed, below the nail plate, or encroaching under the nail platePain; local dystrophy, onycholysis and yellow discoloration of overlying nail
References in periodicals archive ?
With the increasing popularity of high heels shortening of the Achilles tendon, heel pain, pain in the balls of the feet, bunions, calluses, soft corns between the toes, fractures, and sprains have also become quite common.
Soft corns resemble open sores and develop between the toes as they rub against each other.
Other common foot ailments are hard corns (lumps of hard skin on bony areas), soft corns (areas of spongy skin usually in between toes) and bunions (when bones grow out in the wrong direction).
Soft corns are whitish or rubbery in texture and tend to appear between the toes.