sociolinguistics

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sociolinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of the relationship between language and the social context in which it occurs. sociolinguistic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
113) Or as sociolinguists might put it today, Damascenes viewed their pronouncements as "performative utterances", in which the distinction between words and deeds almost imperceptibly melted away.
Sociolinguists have already acknowledged the interplay between language and culture:
As a sociolinguist I particularly appreciated the positive and constructive response by an experienced teacher of nurses, R.
Some sociolinguists can distinguish even more subtle regional dialects, such as differences in the speech of native Virginians from Norfolk as opposed to those from Fairfax.
The study of language as it is formed and evaluated by society is called sociolinguistics, and Switzerland is lucky to have Englishman Peter Trudgill, one of the world's best-known sociolinguists, as a professor at the University of Fribourg.
From a verbal behavior perspective, Kohlenberg and Tsai (1991) show how this preference over extended periods of time could become part of a larger functional unit, such as what is commonly called "self" or what sociolinguists identify as part of the individual and group identity (Ben-Rafael, 1994).
Like other sociolinguists working in Arabic, she also calls for exercising great care in associating the concept of the "standard language" with the "dominant group", which many theories and empirical studies take as a given.
She notes the onslaught of Russian upon Latvian, evoking the process of cannibalism that some African sociolinguists call "glossophagy," whereby one tongue devours another.
Indeed, sociolinguists such as Cameron [1992] have suggested that many language minority women perceive a more narrow occupational array than men because of fewer construction and other physically demanding job opportunities; our occupational sorting results fit with this claim.
Sociolinguists, on the other hand, and especially those working within a symbolic-interactionist framework, take an empirical-ethnographic approach.
Over the past two decades, accumulating research by sociolinguists and ethnographers of communication has suggested that the notion of "communicative competence" should replace "language proficiency" as a generic construct describing a person's ability to use language.
Increased its team of market researchers, sociolinguists and communication specialists to more than 35 employees;