sociolinguistics

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sociolinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of the relationship between language and the social context in which it occurs. sociolinguistic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
One significant omission from both these books is Allan Bell's audience design theory, which is now widely accepted by sociolinguists as a convincing explanatory framework for style shifting and bilingual code switching.
Power: In cultures where there is an obvious generalized power discrepancy between men and women, the possibilities for social solidarity [cum networking and convergence] are severely limited, so sociolinguists consider the sex-matching of dyads to be critical for 'natural' interviews.
Both sociolinguists and those who learn and teach English will want to keep up with these changing patterns of use and regard.
This communal language action, shaped by a specific moment in time, is what sociolinguists, such as Widdowson, quite appropriately describe as context.
As sociolinguists have pointed out, a community's social organization and belief system, its relation to other speech communities, and other factors can all affect whether the community seeks to maintain a native language or adopt the language of others.
Over the last twenty years sociolinguists have accumulated considerable evidence that females and males tend to develop different patterns of interaction.
Sociolinguists explore the interface between language policy mechanisms and practices in educational and additional sites, and examine the ways individuals experience multilingualism and mobility in the context of Europeanization and globalization.
This glossary can be used by linguists, psycholinguists, sociolinguists, students of linguistics, EFL learners, and scholars interested in conducting research in the field of language acquisition.
In so speculating we touch on a topic addressed by many sociolinguists - the distinction which is commonly made between speaker innovation and linguistic change.
To the extent that Labov is right about the isolation of abstract linguistic structures from social evaluation and differentiation, sociolinguists have dealt with a very small portion of the problem of explaining language change by focusing only on those elements affected by social evaluation and stratification.
Too few of the papers are aimed at a general audience of linguists and sociolinguists, and frustratingly there is no basic introduction to the language itself.
are investigated, we would like to stress our duty as sociolinguists and applied linguists to show some skepticism about developing teaching materials based on intuitive judgments and even using empirical research that focuses on specific subgroups of the target culture.